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Social desirability and self-reported anxiety in children: An analysis of the RCMAS lie scale

Dadds, Mark R.; Perrin, Sean LU and Yule, William (1998) In Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 26(4). p.311-317
Abstract
There are important applied and theoretical reasons for research into the association between social desirability and self-reported anxiety in young people. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anxiety and social desirability in a large normative sample of 7- to 14- year-olds (N = 1,786). Participants Completed the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale and their teachers rated children as anxious-not anxious according to specified descriptions. Results indicated that anxiety and lie scores do not correlate for either gender or age grouping. However, anxiety scores interacted with lie scores differently for males and females in terms of the agreement between children's and teacher's ratings of anxiety.... (More)
There are important applied and theoretical reasons for research into the association between social desirability and self-reported anxiety in young people. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anxiety and social desirability in a large normative sample of 7- to 14- year-olds (N = 1,786). Participants Completed the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale and their teachers rated children as anxious-not anxious according to specified descriptions. Results indicated that anxiety and lie scores do not correlate for either gender or age grouping. However, anxiety scores interacted with lie scores differently for males and females in terms of the agreement between children's and teacher's ratings of anxiety. Indications are that social desirability levels may in part explain the consistent discrepancies found between child and adult reports of anxiety in young people. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Anxiety, Lie scores, RCMAS, Social desirability, adolescent, anxiety neurosis, article, child, female, human, major clinical study, male, rating scale, self report, social desirability, teacher
in
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
volume
26
issue
4
pages
7 pages
publisher
Springer New York LLC
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0031827293
ISSN
0091-0627
DOI
10.1023/A:1022610702439
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
65febc70-127c-47f5-8e90-48f0c27f00b5
date added to LUP
2016-11-10 17:34:07
date last changed
2016-11-13 04:43:44
@misc{65febc70-127c-47f5-8e90-48f0c27f00b5,
  abstract     = {There are important applied and theoretical reasons for research into the association between social desirability and self-reported anxiety in young people. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anxiety and social desirability in a large normative sample of 7- to 14- year-olds (N = 1,786). Participants Completed the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale and their teachers rated children as anxious-not anxious according to specified descriptions. Results indicated that anxiety and lie scores do not correlate for either gender or age grouping. However, anxiety scores interacted with lie scores differently for males and females in terms of the agreement between children's and teacher's ratings of anxiety. Indications are that social desirability levels may in part explain the consistent discrepancies found between child and adult reports of anxiety in young people.},
  author       = {Dadds, Mark R. and Perrin, Sean and Yule, William},
  issn         = {0091-0627},
  keyword      = {Anxiety,Lie scores,RCMAS,Social desirability,adolescent,anxiety neurosis,article,child,female,human,major clinical study,male,rating scale,self report,social desirability,teacher},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {311--317},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb27fce8)},
  series       = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
  title        = {Social desirability and self-reported anxiety in children: An analysis of the RCMAS lie scale},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1022610702439},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {1998},
}