Advanced

Risk of malignant melanoma in relation to drug intake, alcohol, smoking and hormonal factors

Westerdahl, J LU ; Olsson, Håkan LU ; Måsbäck, A LU ; Ingvar, C LU and Jonsson, N (1996) In British Journal of Cancer 73(9). p.31-1126
Abstract

In a population-based, matched case-control study from southern Sweden of 400 patients with a first diagnosis of malignant melanoma and 640 healthy control subjects aged 15-75 years, the association between commonly prescribed drugs, alcohol, smoking and malignant melanoma was evaluated. In addition, the relation between reproductive and hormonal factors and melanoma in women was studied. It was found that certain specific types of prescribed drugs, i.e. beta-blockers, hydralazines and benzodiazepines, may increase the risk of melanoma development. However, these associations were diminished, at least for benzodiazepines, after controlling for host factors. As these findings are unconfirmed, and may be due to chance or confounding,... (More)

In a population-based, matched case-control study from southern Sweden of 400 patients with a first diagnosis of malignant melanoma and 640 healthy control subjects aged 15-75 years, the association between commonly prescribed drugs, alcohol, smoking and malignant melanoma was evaluated. In addition, the relation between reproductive and hormonal factors and melanoma in women was studied. It was found that certain specific types of prescribed drugs, i.e. beta-blockers, hydralazines and benzodiazepines, may increase the risk of melanoma development. However, these associations were diminished, at least for benzodiazepines, after controlling for host factors. As these findings are unconfirmed, and may be due to chance or confounding, further studies are warranted. The risk of malignant melanoma was not influenced by alcohol consumption or smoking habits. Our results do not suggest an association between oral contraceptives and melanoma. Furthermore, reproductive factors were not independent risk factors for melanoma. However, increasing number of live births seemed to be protective (P for trend = 0.01). There is a need for further research to be able to draw firm conclusions on the relation between number of live births and melanoma. The results based on histopathological re-examinations and those based on tumour registry data were essentially the same.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescent, Adrenergic Antagonists, Adult, Aged, Alcohol Drinking, Antidepressive Agents, Antipsychotic Agents, Benzodiazepines, Case-Control Studies, Contraceptives, Oral, Diuretics, Drug Therapy, Female, Humans, Maternal Age, Melanoma, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Parity, Risk Factors, Smoking, Sweden
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
73
issue
9
pages
6 pages
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0029875325
ISSN
0007-0920
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6e301ccb-03ec-42d2-ab8f-53ed74f56d0c
date added to LUP
2016-09-18 12:52:20
date last changed
2016-11-20 04:35:45
@misc{6e301ccb-03ec-42d2-ab8f-53ed74f56d0c,
  abstract     = {<p>In a population-based, matched case-control study from southern Sweden of 400 patients with a first diagnosis of malignant melanoma and 640 healthy control subjects aged 15-75 years, the association between commonly prescribed drugs, alcohol, smoking and malignant melanoma was evaluated. In addition, the relation between reproductive and hormonal factors and melanoma in women was studied. It was found that certain specific types of prescribed drugs, i.e. beta-blockers, hydralazines and benzodiazepines, may increase the risk of melanoma development. However, these associations were diminished, at least for benzodiazepines, after controlling for host factors. As these findings are unconfirmed, and may be due to chance or confounding, further studies are warranted. The risk of malignant melanoma was not influenced by alcohol consumption or smoking habits. Our results do not suggest an association between oral contraceptives and melanoma. Furthermore, reproductive factors were not independent risk factors for melanoma. However, increasing number of live births seemed to be protective (P for trend = 0.01). There is a need for further research to be able to draw firm conclusions on the relation between number of live births and melanoma. The results based on histopathological re-examinations and those based on tumour registry data were essentially the same.</p>},
  author       = {Westerdahl, J and Olsson, Håkan and Måsbäck, A and Ingvar, C and Jonsson, N},
  issn         = {0007-0920},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Adrenergic Antagonists,Adult,Aged,Alcohol Drinking,Antidepressive Agents,Antipsychotic Agents,Benzodiazepines,Case-Control Studies,Contraceptives, Oral,Diuretics,Drug Therapy,Female,Humans,Maternal Age,Melanoma,Middle Aged,Odds Ratio,Parity,Risk Factors,Smoking,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {31--1126},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x91b6df0)},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Risk of malignant melanoma in relation to drug intake, alcohol, smoking and hormonal factors},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {1996},
}