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Gamma-Ray Bursts, Supernova Kicks, and Gravitational Radiation

Davies, Melvyn B LU ; King, A.; Rosswog, S. and Wynn, G. (2002) In Astrophysical Journal Letters 579. p.63-69
Abstract
We suggest that the collapsing core of a massive rotating star may fragment to produce two or more compact objects. Their coalescence under gravitational radiation gives the resulting black hole or neutron star a significant kick velocity, which may explain those observed in pulsars. A gamma-ray burst can result only when this kick is small. Thus, only a small fraction of core-collapse supernovae produce gamma-ray bursts. The burst may be delayed significantly (hours to days) after the supernova, as suggested by recent observations. If our picture is correct, core-collapse supernovae should be significant sources of gravitational radiation with a chirp signal similar to a coalescing neutron star binary.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Gravitational Waves, Gamma Rays: Bursts, Stars: Binaries: Close, Accretion Disks, Accretion, Stars: Neutron, Stars: Supernovae: General
in
Astrophysical Journal Letters
volume
579
pages
63 - 69
publisher
University of Chicago Press
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0038420949
ISSN
2041-8213
DOI
10.1086/345288
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
4c92794c-9062-4018-84c5-aae5b75b57c2 (old id 761508)
alternative location
http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/abs/2002ApJ...579L..63D
date added to LUP
2007-12-18 11:59:20
date last changed
2016-12-04 04:45:24
@misc{4c92794c-9062-4018-84c5-aae5b75b57c2,
  abstract     = {We suggest that the collapsing core of a massive rotating star may fragment to produce two or more compact objects. Their coalescence under gravitational radiation gives the resulting black hole or neutron star a significant kick velocity, which may explain those observed in pulsars. A gamma-ray burst can result only when this kick is small. Thus, only a small fraction of core-collapse supernovae produce gamma-ray bursts. The burst may be delayed significantly (hours to days) after the supernova, as suggested by recent observations. If our picture is correct, core-collapse supernovae should be significant sources of gravitational radiation with a chirp signal similar to a coalescing neutron star binary.},
  author       = {Davies, Melvyn B and King, A. and Rosswog, S. and Wynn, G.},
  issn         = {2041-8213},
  keyword      = {Gravitational Waves,Gamma Rays: Bursts,Stars: Binaries: Close,Accretion Disks,Accretion,Stars: Neutron,Stars: Supernovae: General},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {63--69},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa7441d8)},
  series       = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  title        = {Gamma-Ray Bursts, Supernova Kicks, and Gravitational Radiation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/345288},
  volume       = {579},
  year         = {2002},
}