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Optical Studies For Synchrotron Radiation Beamlines

Grizolli, Walan LU (2015)
Abstract (Swedish)
Popular Abstract in English

Among the large variety of experiments performed in science, a common one is to pass a light beam through a sample, the object to be studied, and to study the outcomes of the light-sample interaction. Many light sources have been used for this purpose, like light bulbs and lasers. A modern light source used nowadays is the so-called storage ring. In the storage rings electrons are accelerated and then stored, so that they circulate at a speed close to the speed of light. At these speeds the electrons emit a special kind of light when they travel in a bent path: the synchrotron light. The main property of the synchrotron light is that it is very concentrated (a high flux in a small area) and that... (More)
Popular Abstract in English

Among the large variety of experiments performed in science, a common one is to pass a light beam through a sample, the object to be studied, and to study the outcomes of the light-sample interaction. Many light sources have been used for this purpose, like light bulbs and lasers. A modern light source used nowadays is the so-called storage ring. In the storage rings electrons are accelerated and then stored, so that they circulate at a speed close to the speed of light. At these speeds the electrons emit a special kind of light when they travel in a bent path: the synchrotron light. The main property of the synchrotron light is that it is very concentrated (a high flux in a small area) and that it covers very high energies, from the ultraviolet light (UV) to the X-rays (UV and X-rays are in their nature just like visible light, but with higher energy).



Before reaching the sample under study, the properties of the UV light and of the X-rays must be modified to meet the requirements of the experiments. This is done with optical elements like mirrors, lenses, gratings and crystals. The concept is similar to what is done in experiments with visible light, but UV light and X-rays have some particularities which require operating the optical devices in different manners. For instance, mirrors for X-ray need to operate at very small angles between the light beam and the mirror surface.



This work discusses special solutions using UV and X-ray optics developed for synchrotron light. One of them focuses in an optical design that exploits the high quality of the light sources in MAX II and in MAX IV in order to improve the flexibility of the experiments. The second part of the work describes a device for measuring the polarization of light (one of its properties) that passes through the sample. The last part studies how the wave properties of light affects the performance of the optics. (Less)
Abstract
Synchrotron radiation sources have greatly contributed to the progress in many fields of science. The development of the storage ring technologies has made possible to obtain very low emittance electron beams, which together with the use of undulators allow guiding a very high photon flux into a very small spot required by the experiments.



Development of the sources has been accompanied with equally strong progress in beamline optics, improving further experimental conditions and opening new possibilities in science. This follows from the fact that beamlines have to transport the photon beam from the source to the experiment while conserving the beam quality and the photon flux of the source as good as ... (More)
Synchrotron radiation sources have greatly contributed to the progress in many fields of science. The development of the storage ring technologies has made possible to obtain very low emittance electron beams, which together with the use of undulators allow guiding a very high photon flux into a very small spot required by the experiments.



Development of the sources has been accompanied with equally strong progress in beamline optics, improving further experimental conditions and opening new possibilities in science. This follows from the fact that beamlines have to transport the photon beam from the source to the experiment while conserving the beam quality and the photon flux of the source as good as possible.



This work uses basic concepts of X-ray optics to develop beamlines and beamline instrumentation. First, a beamline design that uses astigmatism is discussed. This project takes advantage of the low vertical emittance of the MAX II and MAX IV storage rings to improve the flexibility of soft X-ray beamlines. Secondly a polarimeter is introduced, a device that characterizes the polarization of the light at the experimental station. In this part a new method is presented for analyzing the polarimeter data. Finally, applying wave optics to X-ray optics is presented and discussed. It is shown how new tools were added into wave propagation modeling, taking into account surface errors of the optical components used in grazing incidence.



For these studies the source properties, X-ray interaction with matter together with many concepts in optics are needed and are also presented here. (Less)
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author
supervisor
opponent
  • Erko, Alexei, Department of Physics Freie Universit├Ąt Berlin; Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Synchrotron Radiation, Optics, X-ray Optics, Beamline, Polarimetry, Coherence, Storage Rings, Diffraction Limited Storage Rings
pages
193 pages
publisher
MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University
defense location
Lundmarksalen at Astronomy Department.
defense date
2015-09-15 10:15
ISBN
978-91-7623-417-4 (print)
978-91-7623-418-1 (pdf)
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
26b8ed1c-f760-4588-9026-3e44c333155f (old id 7760222)
date added to LUP
2015-09-11 18:02:10
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:12
@misc{26b8ed1c-f760-4588-9026-3e44c333155f,
  abstract     = {Synchrotron radiation sources have greatly contributed to the progress in many fields of science. The development of the storage ring technologies has made possible to obtain very low emittance electron beams, which together with the use of undulators allow guiding a very high photon flux into a very small spot required by the experiments.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Development of the sources has been accompanied with equally strong progress in beamline optics, improving further experimental conditions and opening new possibilities in science. This follows from the fact that beamlines have to transport the photon beam from the source to the experiment while conserving the beam quality and the photon flux of the source as good as possible.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
This work uses basic concepts of X-ray optics to develop beamlines and beamline instrumentation. First, a beamline design that uses astigmatism is discussed. This project takes advantage of the low vertical emittance of the MAX II and MAX IV storage rings to improve the flexibility of soft X-ray beamlines. Secondly a polarimeter is introduced, a device that characterizes the polarization of the light at the experimental station. In this part a new method is presented for analyzing the polarimeter data. Finally, applying wave optics to X-ray optics is presented and discussed. It is shown how new tools were added into wave propagation modeling, taking into account surface errors of the optical components used in grazing incidence.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
For these studies the source properties, X-ray interaction with matter together with many concepts in optics are needed and are also presented here.},
  author       = {Grizolli, Walan},
  isbn         = {978-91-7623-417-4 (print)},
  keyword      = {Synchrotron Radiation,Optics,X-ray Optics,Beamline,Polarimetry,Coherence,Storage Rings,Diffraction Limited Storage Rings},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {193},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9ec2198)},
  title        = {Optical Studies For Synchrotron Radiation Beamlines},
  year         = {2015},
}