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Supply Chain Designs for Preparedness

Listou, Tore LU (2015)
Abstract
Purpose of this research

The ability to quickly respond presupposes logistics systems designed to be responsive; supply chains must prepare to act if specific circumstances occur. By investigating ‘preparedness’ in a defence logistics context, the overall research objectives are to define ‘preparedness’ and to advance defence logistics as an academic research area.



Design/methodology/approach

We started with an explorative phase to understand the subject matter. This we combined with literature studies of defence logistics, of preparedness, and of supply chain design to articulate two research questions;

RQ1: In what ways do supply chain designs differ between non-preparedness structures and... (More)
Purpose of this research

The ability to quickly respond presupposes logistics systems designed to be responsive; supply chains must prepare to act if specific circumstances occur. By investigating ‘preparedness’ in a defence logistics context, the overall research objectives are to define ‘preparedness’ and to advance defence logistics as an academic research area.



Design/methodology/approach

We started with an explorative phase to understand the subject matter. This we combined with literature studies of defence logistics, of preparedness, and of supply chain design to articulate two research questions;

RQ1: In what ways do supply chain designs differ between non-preparedness structures and preparedness structures?

RQ2: How does interorganisational interaction in the preparedness phase influence logistics efficiency in the response phase?

We applied an embedded case study design collecting data from two units of analysis. Research rigour was assessed as dependability, confirmability, transferability, and credibility.



Findings

Each of the four papers shed lights to the overarching research objectives. Building on the explorative phase (Papers I and II), Study 1 (Paper III) answers RQ1. We could not conclude that supply chains differed between preparedness and non-preparedness, but concluded that efficiency rather than responsiveness was emphasised. Study 2 (Paper IV) relates to RQ2, and confirmed that suppliers are not involved in preparedness planning. Although inter-organisational coordination takes place prior to deployment, inter-organisational interaction is not emphasised.



Research limitations

We focussed on interfaces between the Defence and upstream supply chain actors related to EU missions. We have no indications whether supply chain designs differ between NATO, UN, and EU operations. We studied relatively standardised supplies / services. Our findings might not apply to other types of defence supply chains. And our conclusions might not apply for larger nations, or for nations outside NATO / PfP.



Research implications

By relating preparedness to a context characterised by increased outsourcing, we emphasise the importance a true (defence) supply chain orientation. We propose to study other supply chains of standardised supplies and services, of complex deliveries, and for units designated for national defence, to broaden our knowledge about defence supply chain designs.



Practical implications

Preparedness presupposes appropriate organisational measures throughout the supply chain. Preparedness organisations need to critically examine how to ensure reliable responsiveness when major parts of the logistics lie outside hierarchical control. Defence organisations need to include suppliers in preparedness planning, in operations planning, and in exercises in order to ensure appropriate interaction.

Originality / value

The term ‘preparedness’ is rarely operationalised in logistics and SCM literature. This research contributes to enhance our understanding of preparedness as a supply chain construct. We also contribute to advancing defence logistics as a field of knowledge based on scientific inquiries. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
supervisor
opponent
  • Dr. Graham E., Heaslip, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Ireland
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
defence supply chains, responsiveness, efficiency, civilising, preparedness, defence logistics
defense location
Room M:B, M-building, Ole Römers väg 1, Lund University Faculty of Engineering, LTH
defense date
2015-09-11 13:00
external identifiers
  • Other:LUTMDN/TMTP-0057-SE
ISBN
978-91-7623-321-4
978-91-7623-322-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6274ec1d-924a-4026-a3dc-b6090faf1442 (old id 7763724)
date added to LUP
2015-08-19 09:03:26
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:15
@misc{6274ec1d-924a-4026-a3dc-b6090faf1442,
  abstract     = {Purpose of this research<br/><br>
The ability to quickly respond presupposes logistics systems designed to be responsive; supply chains must prepare to act if specific circumstances occur. By investigating ‘preparedness’ in a defence logistics context, the overall research objectives are to define ‘preparedness’ and to advance defence logistics as an academic research area.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Design/methodology/approach<br/><br>
We started with an explorative phase to understand the subject matter. This we combined with literature studies of defence logistics, of preparedness, and of supply chain design to articulate two research questions; <br/><br>
RQ1: In what ways do supply chain designs differ between non-preparedness structures and preparedness structures?<br/><br>
RQ2: How does interorganisational interaction in the preparedness phase influence logistics efficiency in the response phase?<br/><br>
We applied an embedded case study design collecting data from two units of analysis. Research rigour was assessed as dependability, confirmability, transferability, and credibility.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Findings <br/><br>
Each of the four papers shed lights to the overarching research objectives. Building on the explorative phase (Papers I and II), Study 1 (Paper III) answers RQ1. We could not conclude that supply chains differed between preparedness and non-preparedness, but concluded that efficiency rather than responsiveness was emphasised. Study 2 (Paper IV) relates to RQ2, and confirmed that suppliers are not involved in preparedness planning. Although inter-organisational coordination takes place prior to deployment, inter-organisational interaction is not emphasised.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Research limitations<br/><br>
We focussed on interfaces between the Defence and upstream supply chain actors related to EU missions. We have no indications whether supply chain designs differ between NATO, UN, and EU operations. We studied relatively standardised supplies / services. Our findings might not apply to other types of defence supply chains. And our conclusions might not apply for larger nations, or for nations outside NATO / PfP. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Research implications<br/><br>
By relating preparedness to a context characterised by increased outsourcing, we emphasise the importance a true (defence) supply chain orientation. We propose to study other supply chains of standardised supplies and services, of complex deliveries, and for units designated for national defence, to broaden our knowledge about defence supply chain designs.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Practical implications <br/><br>
Preparedness presupposes appropriate organisational measures throughout the supply chain. Preparedness organisations need to critically examine how to ensure reliable responsiveness when major parts of the logistics lie outside hierarchical control. Defence organisations need to include suppliers in preparedness planning, in operations planning, and in exercises in order to ensure appropriate interaction.<br/><br>
Originality / value<br/><br>
The term ‘preparedness’ is rarely operationalised in logistics and SCM literature. This research contributes to enhance our understanding of preparedness as a supply chain construct. We also contribute to advancing defence logistics as a field of knowledge based on scientific inquiries.},
  author       = {Listou, Tore},
  isbn         = {978-91-7623-321-4},
  keyword      = {defence supply chains,responsiveness,efficiency,civilising,preparedness,defence logistics},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Supply Chain Designs for Preparedness},
  year         = {2015},
}