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'Convergence' in the security industry – definitions, drivers and consequences

Weaver, Benjamin LU (2008) In Lusax memo series LXM-BW2.
Abstract
Drawing on a combination of empirical industry observations and management literature, this document at- tempts to shed some light on the usage of the term ‘convergence’ that can be identified within the security sector. The aim is to provide both a typology of definitions and a discussion of some of the strategic implica- tions of different types of convergence. A basic distinction is made between convergence on the demand-side (inside enterprise organizations) and the supply-side (technology and products and services). Demand-side convergence is identified as a unified approach to security that entails tearing down the organizational walls that separate the physical security, IT and information security functions. This notion of... (More)
Drawing on a combination of empirical industry observations and management literature, this document at- tempts to shed some light on the usage of the term ‘convergence’ that can be identified within the security sector. The aim is to provide both a typology of definitions and a discussion of some of the strategic implica- tions of different types of convergence. A basic distinction is made between convergence on the demand-side (inside enterprise organizations) and the supply-side (technology and products and services). Demand-side convergence is identified as a unified approach to security that entails tearing down the organizational walls that separate the physical security, IT and information security functions. This notion of convergence is fo- cused on the organization of security work in terms of people, processes and technology. On the supply side, technological convergence is identified as a set of concurrent trends that have enabled the shift towards intel- ligent network devices. At the product (and service offering) level, a distinction is made between convergence in substitutes (e.g. IP cameras replacing analog cameras) and convergence in complements (e.g. bundling of software, hardware and services). Seen from an industry perspective, these two types of convergence have different consequences. The former potentially leads to an industry shakeout, where entrant companies chal- lenge incumbents’ dominant positions, while the latter may lead to alliance seeking and vertical integration. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
published
subject
keywords
security industry, security, industry convergence, convergence
categories
Popular Science
in
Lusax memo series
volume
LXM-BW2
pages
6 pages
publisher
Institute of Economic Research, Lund University
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a25e7e23-3df7-419c-83eb-b7021765ff46 (old id 7854650)
alternative location
https://publicera.ehl.lu.se/media/lusax/lxm-bw2-convergence.pdf
date added to LUP
2015-09-04 13:36:50
date last changed
2016-04-16 08:30:26
@misc{a25e7e23-3df7-419c-83eb-b7021765ff46,
  abstract     = {Drawing on a combination of empirical industry observations and management literature, this document at- tempts to shed some light on the usage of the term ‘convergence’ that can be identified within the security sector. The aim is to provide both a typology of definitions and a discussion of some of the strategic implica- tions of different types of convergence. A basic distinction is made between convergence on the demand-side (inside enterprise organizations) and the supply-side (technology and products and services). Demand-side convergence is identified as a unified approach to security that entails tearing down the organizational walls that separate the physical security, IT and information security functions. This notion of convergence is fo- cused on the organization of security work in terms of people, processes and technology. On the supply side, technological convergence is identified as a set of concurrent trends that have enabled the shift towards intel- ligent network devices. At the product (and service offering) level, a distinction is made between convergence in substitutes (e.g. IP cameras replacing analog cameras) and convergence in complements (e.g. bundling of software, hardware and services). Seen from an industry perspective, these two types of convergence have different consequences. The former potentially leads to an industry shakeout, where entrant companies chal- lenge incumbents’ dominant positions, while the latter may lead to alliance seeking and vertical integration.},
  author       = {Weaver, Benjamin},
  keyword      = {security industry,security,industry convergence,convergence},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {6},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xaef3a00)},
  series       = {Lusax memo series},
  title        = {'Convergence' in the security industry – definitions, drivers and consequences},
  volume       = {LXM-BW2},
  year         = {2008},
}