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Determination of Haemoglobin and Prothrombin Complex in Whole Blood using Optothermal Spectrometry

Masson, P.; Elwing, H.; Lundström, I.; Karlsson, J. O. LU and Helander, P. LU (1989) In Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine 27(12). p.947-952
Abstract

Optothermal spectrometry measures the thermal energy produced as a result of absorption by molecules at a given modulation frequency and wavelength. Depending on the modulation frequency used, analysis can be performed in very thin layers (50—150 micrometers). A major advantage of optothermal spectrometry is that it is not very sensitive to light scattering. Haemoglobin in whole blood was measured without any reagent at 16 Hz and 2 Hz frequencies. The precisions (within-series, within-day and between-day) were acceptable, and comparisons with reference methods were excellent. As opposed to the reference methods, optothermal spectrometric determinations were not affected by lipaemia. When measured continuously, the signal for haemoglobin... (More)

Optothermal spectrometry measures the thermal energy produced as a result of absorption by molecules at a given modulation frequency and wavelength. Depending on the modulation frequency used, analysis can be performed in very thin layers (50—150 micrometers). A major advantage of optothermal spectrometry is that it is not very sensitive to light scattering. Haemoglobin in whole blood was measured without any reagent at 16 Hz and 2 Hz frequencies. The precisions (within-series, within-day and between-day) were acceptable, and comparisons with reference methods were excellent. As opposed to the reference methods, optothermal spectrometric determinations were not affected by lipaemia. When measured continuously, the signal for haemoglobin increased due to the packing of erythrocytes towards the light source. By converting soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin, the erythrocyte packing could either be inhibited or stopped, and this process could be monitored by assessing the change in the rate of signal increase for haemoglobin. This principle was utilized to analyse the prothrombin complex; the method was found to have acceptable precision and to be comparable to a routine method. © 1989 Walter de Gruyter & Co.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Haemoglobin, Prothrombin Complex , Optothermal Spectrometry , blood
in
Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
volume
27
issue
12
pages
6 pages
publisher
De Gruyter
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84961479334
ISSN
1434-6621
DOI
10.1515/cclm.1989.27.12.947
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
79832d63-277d-40cd-863d-b9088324fae9
date added to LUP
2016-05-19 15:40:29
date last changed
2016-07-04 12:25:01
@misc{79832d63-277d-40cd-863d-b9088324fae9,
  abstract     = {<p>Optothermal spectrometry measures the thermal energy produced as a result of absorption by molecules at a given modulation frequency and wavelength. Depending on the modulation frequency used, analysis can be performed in very thin layers (50—150 micrometers). A major advantage of optothermal spectrometry is that it is not very sensitive to light scattering. Haemoglobin in whole blood was measured without any reagent at 16 Hz and 2 Hz frequencies. The precisions (within-series, within-day and between-day) were acceptable, and comparisons with reference methods were excellent. As opposed to the reference methods, optothermal spectrometric determinations were not affected by lipaemia. When measured continuously, the signal for haemoglobin increased due to the packing of erythrocytes towards the light source. By converting soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin, the erythrocyte packing could either be inhibited or stopped, and this process could be monitored by assessing the change in the rate of signal increase for haemoglobin. This principle was utilized to analyse the prothrombin complex; the method was found to have acceptable precision and to be comparable to a routine method. © 1989 Walter de Gruyter &amp; Co.</p>},
  author       = {Masson, P. and Elwing, H. and Lundström, I. and Karlsson, J. O. and Helander, P.},
  issn         = {1434-6621},
  keyword      = {Haemoglobin,Prothrombin Complex ,Optothermal Spectrometry  ,blood},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {947--952},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x7d88df0)},
  series       = {Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine},
  title        = {Determination of Haemoglobin and Prothrombin Complex in Whole Blood using Optothermal Spectrometry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm.1989.27.12.947},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {1989},
}