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Recipient T lymphocytes modulate the severity of antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury

Fung, Yoke Lin; Kim, Michael; Tabuchi, Arata; Aslam, Rukhsana; Speck, Edwin R; Chow, Leola; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Freedman, John and Semple, John W LU (2010) In Blood 116(16). p.9-3073
Abstract

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious complication of transfusion and has been ranked as one of the leading causes of transfusion-related fatalities. Nonetheless, many details of the immunopathogenesis of TRALI, particularly with respect to recipient factors are unknown. We used a murine model of antibody-mediated TRALI in an attempt to understand the role that recipient lymphocytes might play in TRALI reactions. Intravenous injection of an IgG2a antimurine major histocompatibility complex class I antibody (34-1-2s) into BALB/c mice induced moderate hypothermia and pulmonary granulocyte accumulation but no pulmonary edema nor mortality. In contrast, 34-1-2s injections into mice with severe combined immunodeficiency... (More)

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious complication of transfusion and has been ranked as one of the leading causes of transfusion-related fatalities. Nonetheless, many details of the immunopathogenesis of TRALI, particularly with respect to recipient factors are unknown. We used a murine model of antibody-mediated TRALI in an attempt to understand the role that recipient lymphocytes might play in TRALI reactions. Intravenous injection of an IgG2a antimurine major histocompatibility complex class I antibody (34-1-2s) into BALB/c mice induced moderate hypothermia and pulmonary granulocyte accumulation but no pulmonary edema nor mortality. In contrast, 34-1-2s injections into mice with severe combined immunodeficiency caused severe hypothermia, severe pulmonary edema, and approximately 40% mortality indicating a critical role for T and B lymphocytes in suppressing TRALI reactions. Adoptive transfer of purified CD8(+) T lymphocytes or CD4(+) T cells but not CD19(+) B cells into the severe combined immunodeficiency mice alleviated the antibody-induced hypothermia, lung damage, and mortality, suggesting that T lymphocytes were responsible for the protective effect. Taken together, these results suggest that recipient T lymphocytes play a significant role in suppressing antibody-mediated TRALI reactions. They identify a potentially new recipient mechanism that controls the severity of TRALI reactions.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Acute Lung Injury, Animals, Antibodies, Blood Transfusion, Chemokine CXCL2, Histocompatibility Antigens Class I, Hypothermia, Immunoglobulin G, Lung, Lymphocyte Transfusion, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, SCID, Neutrophils, T-Lymphocytes, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Blood
volume
116
issue
16
pages
7 pages
publisher
American Society of Hematology
external identifiers
  • Scopus:77958171596
ISSN
1528-0020
DOI
10.1182/blood-2010-05-284570
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
8050c716-0bfe-4d13-8900-d80993466663
date added to LUP
2016-09-23 12:05:43
date last changed
2016-10-13 05:14:15
@misc{8050c716-0bfe-4d13-8900-d80993466663,
  abstract     = {<p>Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious complication of transfusion and has been ranked as one of the leading causes of transfusion-related fatalities. Nonetheless, many details of the immunopathogenesis of TRALI, particularly with respect to recipient factors are unknown. We used a murine model of antibody-mediated TRALI in an attempt to understand the role that recipient lymphocytes might play in TRALI reactions. Intravenous injection of an IgG2a antimurine major histocompatibility complex class I antibody (34-1-2s) into BALB/c mice induced moderate hypothermia and pulmonary granulocyte accumulation but no pulmonary edema nor mortality. In contrast, 34-1-2s injections into mice with severe combined immunodeficiency caused severe hypothermia, severe pulmonary edema, and approximately 40% mortality indicating a critical role for T and B lymphocytes in suppressing TRALI reactions. Adoptive transfer of purified CD8(+) T lymphocytes or CD4(+) T cells but not CD19(+) B cells into the severe combined immunodeficiency mice alleviated the antibody-induced hypothermia, lung damage, and mortality, suggesting that T lymphocytes were responsible for the protective effect. Taken together, these results suggest that recipient T lymphocytes play a significant role in suppressing antibody-mediated TRALI reactions. They identify a potentially new recipient mechanism that controls the severity of TRALI reactions.</p>},
  author       = {Fung, Yoke Lin and Kim, Michael and Tabuchi, Arata and Aslam, Rukhsana and Speck, Edwin R and Chow, Leola and Kuebler, Wolfgang M and Freedman, John and Semple, John W},
  issn         = {1528-0020},
  keyword      = {Acute Lung Injury,Animals,Antibodies,Blood Transfusion,Chemokine CXCL2,Histocompatibility Antigens Class I,Hypothermia,Immunoglobulin G,Lung,Lymphocyte Transfusion,Male,Mice,Mice, Inbred BALB C,Mice, SCID,Neutrophils,T-Lymphocytes,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {9--3073},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa338560)},
  series       = {Blood},
  title        = {Recipient T lymphocytes modulate the severity of antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2010-05-284570},
  volume       = {116},
  year         = {2010},
}