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Vertical temperature increase in multi-storey buildings

Dahlblom, Mats LU and Jensen, Lars LU (2014) 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics In NSB 2014 : 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics,15-19 June 2014 Lund, Sweden p.814-821
Abstract
Indoor temperature is by measurements stated to rise 0.1 – 0.2°C per storey upwards in multi-storey buildings, despite occupants’ possibility to control the temperature. Due to upward air temperature gradient in rooms there will be a heat transfer through slabs upwards. The size of this depends on

insulation degree of building envelope and slabs and air flow through the building. With a linear mathematical model, considering 1 m² floor area, it is shown how some parameters affect the heat transfer. Starting position for the model is a building in the thermal balance from which deviations are calculated. The model gives, for a basic case, results that agree well with the measured values. The vertical temperature increase, results... (More)
Indoor temperature is by measurements stated to rise 0.1 – 0.2°C per storey upwards in multi-storey buildings, despite occupants’ possibility to control the temperature. Due to upward air temperature gradient in rooms there will be a heat transfer through slabs upwards. The size of this depends on

insulation degree of building envelope and slabs and air flow through the building. With a linear mathematical model, considering 1 m² floor area, it is shown how some parameters affect the heat transfer. Starting position for the model is a building in the thermal balance from which deviations are calculated. The model gives, for a basic case, results that agree well with the measured values. The vertical temperature increase, results in lower temperature in lower storeys and higher temperature in upper storeys. Total temperature rise for 4 – 28 storeys are in the range 0.5 – 0.7°C,

which give vertical heat transfer of 0.6 – 1.1 W/m². A better insulated building envelope will increase the vertical temperature deviations. Better insulated slabs between the storeys will decrease the deviations. A building with well insulated envelope should also have well insulated slabs between

storeys to limit the vertical heat transfer and temperature differences between storeys. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Thermal indoor climate, indoor temperature, vertical temperature increase, case study, mathematical model, disturbance model
in
NSB 2014 : 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics,15-19 June 2014 Lund, Sweden
pages
814 - 821
conference name
10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics
ISBN
978-91-88722-53-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f30ca0c9-bd9f-4f09-8218-24cf5aeb92ec (old id 8309668)
date added to LUP
2015-12-08 19:40:40
date last changed
2016-04-16 12:34:37
@misc{f30ca0c9-bd9f-4f09-8218-24cf5aeb92ec,
  abstract     = {Indoor temperature is by measurements stated to rise 0.1 – 0.2°C per storey upwards in multi-storey buildings, despite occupants’ possibility to control the temperature. Due to upward air temperature gradient in rooms there will be a heat transfer through slabs upwards. The size of this depends on<br/><br>
insulation degree of building envelope and slabs and air flow through the building. With a linear mathematical model, considering 1 m² floor area, it is shown how some parameters affect the heat transfer. Starting position for the model is a building in the thermal balance from which deviations are calculated. The model gives, for a basic case, results that agree well with the measured values. The vertical temperature increase, results in lower temperature in lower storeys and higher temperature in upper storeys. Total temperature rise for 4 – 28 storeys are in the range 0.5 – 0.7°C,<br/><br>
which give vertical heat transfer of 0.6 – 1.1 W/m². A better insulated building envelope will increase the vertical temperature deviations. Better insulated slabs between the storeys will decrease the deviations. A building with well insulated envelope should also have well insulated slabs between<br/><br>
storeys to limit the vertical heat transfer and temperature differences between storeys.},
  author       = {Dahlblom, Mats and Jensen, Lars},
  isbn         = {978-91-88722-53-9},
  keyword      = {Thermal indoor climate,indoor temperature,vertical temperature increase,case study,mathematical model,disturbance model},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {814--821},
  series       = {NSB 2014 : 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics,15-19 June 2014 Lund, Sweden},
  title        = {Vertical temperature increase in multi-storey buildings},
  year         = {2014},
}