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Statin Use and Breast Cancer Risk in the Nurses' Health Study.

Borgquist, Signe LU ; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chen, Wendy Y; Garber, Judy E; Eliassen, A Heather and Ahern, Thomas P (2016) In Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology 25(1). p.201-206
Abstract
Preclinical studies support an anticancer effect of statin drugs, yet epidemiologic evidence remains inconsistent regarding their role in breast cancer primary prevention. Here, we report an updated analysis of the association between statin use and breast cancer incidence in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) cohort. Postmenopausal NHS participants without a cancer history were followed from 2000 until 2012 (n = 79,518). Data on statin use were retrieved from biennial questionnaires. We fit Cox regression models to estimate associations between longitudinal statin use and breast cancer incidence. Over 823,086 person-years of follow-up, 3,055 cases of invasive breast cancer occurred. Compared with never users, both former and current statin... (More)
Preclinical studies support an anticancer effect of statin drugs, yet epidemiologic evidence remains inconsistent regarding their role in breast cancer primary prevention. Here, we report an updated analysis of the association between statin use and breast cancer incidence in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) cohort. Postmenopausal NHS participants without a cancer history were followed from 2000 until 2012 (n = 79,518). Data on statin use were retrieved from biennial questionnaires. We fit Cox regression models to estimate associations between longitudinal statin use and breast cancer incidence. Over 823,086 person-years of follow-up, 3,055 cases of invasive breast cancer occurred. Compared with never users, both former and current statin users had similar rates of invasive breast cancer incidence [former users: HRadj, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82-1.1; current users: HRadj, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.92-1.3]. Associations did not differ by estrogen receptor (ER) status or histology (ductal vs. lobular carcinoma). Statin use was not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer, irrespective of histologic subtype and ER status. Statin drugs do not appear to modify processes involved in breast cancer initiation. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(1); 201-6. ©2016 AACR. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
volume
25
issue
1
pages
201 - 206
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research
external identifiers
  • PMID:26762806
  • Scopus:84955325148
  • WOS:000372171400026
ISSN
1538-7755
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0654
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
095f761d-26e8-4e45-bca3-8a558c5b912f (old id 8592166)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26762806?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-02-03 13:02:52
date last changed
2016-11-30 14:00:25
@misc{095f761d-26e8-4e45-bca3-8a558c5b912f,
  abstract     = {Preclinical studies support an anticancer effect of statin drugs, yet epidemiologic evidence remains inconsistent regarding their role in breast cancer primary prevention. Here, we report an updated analysis of the association between statin use and breast cancer incidence in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) cohort. Postmenopausal NHS participants without a cancer history were followed from 2000 until 2012 (n = 79,518). Data on statin use were retrieved from biennial questionnaires. We fit Cox regression models to estimate associations between longitudinal statin use and breast cancer incidence. Over 823,086 person-years of follow-up, 3,055 cases of invasive breast cancer occurred. Compared with never users, both former and current statin users had similar rates of invasive breast cancer incidence [former users: HRadj, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82-1.1; current users: HRadj, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.92-1.3]. Associations did not differ by estrogen receptor (ER) status or histology (ductal vs. lobular carcinoma). Statin use was not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer, irrespective of histologic subtype and ER status. Statin drugs do not appear to modify processes involved in breast cancer initiation. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(1); 201-6. ©2016 AACR.},
  author       = {Borgquist, Signe and Tamimi, Rulla M and Chen, Wendy Y and Garber, Judy E and Eliassen, A Heather and Ahern, Thomas P},
  issn         = {1538-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {201--206},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8a483e8)},
  series       = {Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology},
  title        = {Statin Use and Breast Cancer Risk in the Nurses' Health Study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0654},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2016},
}