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Tyrosinase graphite-epoxy based composite electrodes for detection of phenols

Önnerfjord, Patrik LU ; Emnéus, Jenny LU ; Marko-Varga, György LU ; Gorton, Lo LU ; Ortega, Fidel and Domínguez, Elena (1995) In Biosensors and Bioelectronics 10(6-7). p.607-619
Abstract

The characterization and analytical performance of a tyrosinase graphite-epoxy electrode for the detection of phenolic compounds are described. The biocomposite configuration is based on the entrapment of commercially available tyrosinase in a graphite-epoxy matrix, and the mixing of the resulting conductive epoxy resin with a hardener. The enzyme electrode is mounted as a working electrode in an amperometric flow cell of the confined wall-jet type and studied in the flow injection mode. The bioprobe is electrochemically characterized by hydrodynamic and cyclic voltammetry for catechol and phenol. An applied potential of -100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl is found to be optimal for electrochemical reduction of the enzyme products (quinone forms) for... (More)

The characterization and analytical performance of a tyrosinase graphite-epoxy electrode for the detection of phenolic compounds are described. The biocomposite configuration is based on the entrapment of commercially available tyrosinase in a graphite-epoxy matrix, and the mixing of the resulting conductive epoxy resin with a hardener. The enzyme electrode is mounted as a working electrode in an amperometric flow cell of the confined wall-jet type and studied in the flow injection mode. The bioprobe is electrochemically characterized by hydrodynamic and cyclic voltammetry for catechol and phenol. An applied potential of -100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl is found to be optimal for electrochemical reduction of the enzyme products (quinone forms) for the biocomposite electrode. The dependence of the response of the biocomposite on the flow rate, the amount of loaded enzyme, the buffer composition, pH, and oxygen is investigated. The response of the biosensor to different phenolic compounds is also evaluated. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) for phenol and catechol were 1·0 μM and 0·04 μM, respectively. No loss in response could be detected after 100 injections of catechol (R.S.D. <2%). Stability of the biocomposite depends on storage conditions. Theoretical advantages described in the literature for biocomposite electrodes, for example, repolishing and bulk modification, are empirically studied in this work. © 1995.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
biocomposite, biosensor, phenolic compounds, tyrosinase
in
Biosensors and Bioelectronics
volume
10
issue
6-7
pages
607 - 619
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0029043585
ISSN
0956-5663
DOI
10.1016/0956-5663(95)96937-T
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
ae179e38-f6eb-40aa-a185-2b9e67a11906
date added to LUP
2016-10-14 11:41:45
date last changed
2016-11-28 12:31:31
@misc{ae179e38-f6eb-40aa-a185-2b9e67a11906,
  abstract     = {<p>The characterization and analytical performance of a tyrosinase graphite-epoxy electrode for the detection of phenolic compounds are described. The biocomposite configuration is based on the entrapment of commercially available tyrosinase in a graphite-epoxy matrix, and the mixing of the resulting conductive epoxy resin with a hardener. The enzyme electrode is mounted as a working electrode in an amperometric flow cell of the confined wall-jet type and studied in the flow injection mode. The bioprobe is electrochemically characterized by hydrodynamic and cyclic voltammetry for catechol and phenol. An applied potential of -100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl is found to be optimal for electrochemical reduction of the enzyme products (quinone forms) for the biocomposite electrode. The dependence of the response of the biocomposite on the flow rate, the amount of loaded enzyme, the buffer composition, pH, and oxygen is investigated. The response of the biosensor to different phenolic compounds is also evaluated. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) for phenol and catechol were 1·0 μM and 0·04 μM, respectively. No loss in response could be detected after 100 injections of catechol (R.S.D. &lt;2%). Stability of the biocomposite depends on storage conditions. Theoretical advantages described in the literature for biocomposite electrodes, for example, repolishing and bulk modification, are empirically studied in this work. © 1995.</p>},
  author       = {Önnerfjord, Patrik and Emnéus, Jenny and Marko-Varga, György and Gorton, Lo and Ortega, Fidel and Domínguez, Elena},
  issn         = {0956-5663},
  keyword      = {biocomposite,biosensor,phenolic compounds,tyrosinase},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6-7},
  pages        = {607--619},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x98c28e8)},
  series       = {Biosensors and Bioelectronics},
  title        = {Tyrosinase graphite-epoxy based composite electrodes for detection of phenols},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0956-5663(95)96937-T},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {1995},
}