Advanced

Incomplete degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil inoculated with wood rotting fungi and their effect on the indigenous soil bacteria

Andersson, Erik LU ; Lundstedt, Staffan; Tornberg, Karin; Schnürer, Ylva; Öberg, Lars and Mattiasson, Bo LU (2003) In Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 22(6). p.43-1238
Abstract
Soil artificially contaminated with fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benz[a]anthracene was inoculated with the wood-rotting fungi Plrurotus ostreatus and Antrodia vaillantii. During 12 weeks of incubation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation and the formation of persistent degradation products were monitored by chemical analysis. In addition, the effect on the indigenous soil bacteria was studied by plate count techniques and by measuring the concentration of bacteria-specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). In both soils inoculated with fungi, the PAH degradation was enhanced compared to the control soil without fungi. The white-rot fungus P. ostreatus accelerated the degradation rate radically the first weeks, while... (More)
Soil artificially contaminated with fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benz[a]anthracene was inoculated with the wood-rotting fungi Plrurotus ostreatus and Antrodia vaillantii. During 12 weeks of incubation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation and the formation of persistent degradation products were monitored by chemical analysis. In addition, the effect on the indigenous soil bacteria was studied by plate count techniques and by measuring the concentration of bacteria-specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). In both soils inoculated with fungi, the PAH degradation was enhanced compared to the control soil without fungi. The white-rot fungus P. ostreatus accelerated the degradation rate radically the first weeks, while the effect of the brown-rot fungus was more pronounced at later stages during the 12-week study. In a soil with no amendments, the final degradation result was similar to that in the soil with added fungi, although the degradation pattern for the individual PAHs was different. Furthermore, the degradation by P. ostreatus was accompanied by an accumulation of PAH metabolites, that is, 9-fluorenone, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, and two compounds identified as 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone and 4-oxapyrene-5-one, that was not seen in the other soils. The inoculation with the white-rot fungus also had a large negative effect on the indigenous soil bacteria. This could be an important drawback of using the white-rot fungus P. ostreatus in soil bioremediation since a sequential fungal-bacterial degradation probably is needed for a complete degradation of PAHs in soil. In the soil inoculated with A. vaillantii, on the other hand, no metabolites accumulated, and no negative effects were observed on the indigenous microorganisms. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
soil white-rot fungi, hydrocarbon metabolites, polycyclic aromatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, degradation
in
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
volume
22
issue
6
pages
6 pages
publisher
SETAC and Alliance Communications Group
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0012938661
ISSN
0730-7268
DOI
10.1002/etc.5620220608
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
caf7dd5e-5d48-4c9c-84ca-94f30812b539
date added to LUP
2016-04-14 11:30:11
date last changed
2016-11-06 04:36:43
@misc{caf7dd5e-5d48-4c9c-84ca-94f30812b539,
  abstract     = {Soil artificially contaminated with fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benz[a]anthracene was inoculated with the wood-rotting fungi Plrurotus ostreatus and Antrodia vaillantii. During 12 weeks of incubation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation and the formation of persistent degradation products were monitored by chemical analysis. In addition, the effect on the indigenous soil bacteria was studied by plate count techniques and by measuring the concentration of bacteria-specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). In both soils inoculated with fungi, the PAH degradation was enhanced compared to the control soil without fungi. The white-rot fungus P. ostreatus accelerated the degradation rate radically the first weeks, while the effect of the brown-rot fungus was more pronounced at later stages during the 12-week study. In a soil with no amendments, the final degradation result was similar to that in the soil with added fungi, although the degradation pattern for the individual PAHs was different. Furthermore, the degradation by P. ostreatus was accompanied by an accumulation of PAH metabolites, that is, 9-fluorenone, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, and two compounds identified as 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone and 4-oxapyrene-5-one, that was not seen in the other soils. The inoculation with the white-rot fungus also had a large negative effect on the indigenous soil bacteria. This could be an important drawback of using the white-rot fungus P. ostreatus in soil bioremediation since a sequential fungal-bacterial degradation probably is needed for a complete degradation of PAHs in soil. In the soil inoculated with A. vaillantii, on the other hand, no metabolites accumulated, and no negative effects were observed on the indigenous microorganisms.},
  author       = {Andersson, Erik and Lundstedt, Staffan and Tornberg, Karin and Schnürer, Ylva and Öberg, Lars and Mattiasson, Bo},
  issn         = {0730-7268},
  keyword      = {soil white-rot fungi,hydrocarbon metabolites,polycyclic aromatic,polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons,degradation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {43--1238},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9ccc090)},
  series       = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry},
  title        = {Incomplete degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil inoculated with wood rotting fungi and their effect on the indigenous soil bacteria},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/etc.5620220608},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2003},
}