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Cell-based cartilage repair : Do we need it, can we do it, is it good, can we prove it?

Stefan Lohmander, L. LU (1998) In Current Opinion in Orthopaedics 9(6). p.38-42
Abstract

Adult human joint cartilage lesions do not spontaneously heal. Patients with isolated articular cartilage lesions make up perhaps some 1% of the total number of patients examined by arthroscopy. Symptoms such pain and locking, and the suggestion that the untreated lesions may progress to osteoarthritis form the basis for current attempts to repair articular cartilage by cell transplantation and other methods. Animal model work and preliminary experience in humans suggest that some degree of cartilage repair can be accomplished with these methods. However, the long-term fate of the transplants, and the benefits are still uncertain. No randomized, controlled and blinded trials have been presented, and available data do not support any... (More)

Adult human joint cartilage lesions do not spontaneously heal. Patients with isolated articular cartilage lesions make up perhaps some 1% of the total number of patients examined by arthroscopy. Symptoms such pain and locking, and the suggestion that the untreated lesions may progress to osteoarthritis form the basis for current attempts to repair articular cartilage by cell transplantation and other methods. Animal model work and preliminary experience in humans suggest that some degree of cartilage repair can be accomplished with these methods. However, the long-term fate of the transplants, and the benefits are still uncertain. No randomized, controlled and blinded trials have been presented, and available data do not support any certain conclusions with regard to the superiority of one method of cartilage repair over the other, or indeed over treatment without surgery. Better understanding of the role of morphogens, growth factors, stem cells, cartilage development and biology, and tissue engineering may allow the development of improved therapy. Treatment with these experimental methods should only lie done within the context of strictly designed randomized, controlled and masked clinical trials with several years of follow-up time.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
in
Current Opinion in Orthopaedics
volume
9
issue
6
pages
5 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0032465510
ISSN
1041-9918
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
cc664b8a-4c6a-4a2d-a2b4-2604c240580e
date added to LUP
2016-05-04 23:58:59
date last changed
2016-07-15 11:12:06
@misc{cc664b8a-4c6a-4a2d-a2b4-2604c240580e,
  abstract     = {<p>Adult human joint cartilage lesions do not spontaneously heal. Patients with isolated articular cartilage lesions make up perhaps some 1% of the total number of patients examined by arthroscopy. Symptoms such pain and locking, and the suggestion that the untreated lesions may progress to osteoarthritis form the basis for current attempts to repair articular cartilage by cell transplantation and other methods. Animal model work and preliminary experience in humans suggest that some degree of cartilage repair can be accomplished with these methods. However, the long-term fate of the transplants, and the benefits are still uncertain. No randomized, controlled and blinded trials have been presented, and available data do not support any certain conclusions with regard to the superiority of one method of cartilage repair over the other, or indeed over treatment without surgery. Better understanding of the role of morphogens, growth factors, stem cells, cartilage development and biology, and tissue engineering may allow the development of improved therapy. Treatment with these experimental methods should only lie done within the context of strictly designed randomized, controlled and masked clinical trials with several years of follow-up time.</p>},
  author       = {Stefan Lohmander, L.},
  issn         = {1041-9918},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {38--42},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x7e8b630)},
  series       = {Current Opinion in Orthopaedics},
  title        = {Cell-based cartilage repair : Do we need it, can we do it, is it good, can we prove it?},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {1998},
}