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Flee or fight uncertainty : Plant strategies in relation to anticipated damage

Järemo, Johannes LU ; Ripa, Jörgen LU and Nilsson, Patric LU (1999) In Ecology Letters 2(6). p.361-366
Abstract

In order to cope with damage, plants have evolved a number of strategies. We incorporate two of those strategies, compensatory regrowth and escaping damage in time, into a mathematical model in an attempt to outline under what circumstances one or the other of these phenotypic traits will evolve. Escaping damage in time is accomplished by flowering and setting seeds at a point of time when the risk of damage is low, whereas a compensatory capacity is made possible by activating a proportion of meristems that are left dormant. Our analysis suggests that damage that is predictable in time will favour phenotypes that flower late in the season and that have a good compensatory capacity. As damage becomes less predictable in time, a strategy... (More)

In order to cope with damage, plants have evolved a number of strategies. We incorporate two of those strategies, compensatory regrowth and escaping damage in time, into a mathematical model in an attempt to outline under what circumstances one or the other of these phenotypic traits will evolve. Escaping damage in time is accomplished by flowering and setting seeds at a point of time when the risk of damage is low, whereas a compensatory capacity is made possible by activating a proportion of meristems that are left dormant. Our analysis suggests that damage that is predictable in time will favour phenotypes that flower late in the season and that have a good compensatory capacity. As damage becomes less predictable in time, a strategy that implies flowering as early as possible in the season and with no compensatory capacity at all, becomes advantageous.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bet-hedging, Bud dormancy, Compensation, Damage, Flowering time, Herbivory, Predictability
in
Ecology Letters
volume
2
issue
6
pages
6 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0032717387
ISSN
1461-023X
DOI
10.1046/j.1461-0248.1999.00095.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d9c773af-7780-4610-9e74-ac223a3ecdde
date added to LUP
2016-08-23 16:02:27
date last changed
2016-08-23 17:17:19
@misc{d9c773af-7780-4610-9e74-ac223a3ecdde,
  abstract     = {<p>In order to cope with damage, plants have evolved a number of strategies. We incorporate two of those strategies, compensatory regrowth and escaping damage in time, into a mathematical model in an attempt to outline under what circumstances one or the other of these phenotypic traits will evolve. Escaping damage in time is accomplished by flowering and setting seeds at a point of time when the risk of damage is low, whereas a compensatory capacity is made possible by activating a proportion of meristems that are left dormant. Our analysis suggests that damage that is predictable in time will favour phenotypes that flower late in the season and that have a good compensatory capacity. As damage becomes less predictable in time, a strategy that implies flowering as early as possible in the season and with no compensatory capacity at all, becomes advantageous.</p>},
  author       = {Järemo, Johannes and Ripa, Jörgen and Nilsson, Patric},
  issn         = {1461-023X},
  keyword      = {Bet-hedging,Bud dormancy,Compensation,Damage,Flowering time,Herbivory,Predictability},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {361--366},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9a06238)},
  series       = {Ecology Letters},
  title        = {Flee or fight uncertainty : Plant strategies in relation to anticipated damage},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1461-0248.1999.00095.x},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {1999},
}