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Svenska Bibelsällskapets provöversättning i ett internationellt perspektiv

Nässelqvist, Dan LU (2015) In Svensk Teologisk Kvartalskrift 91(4). p.154-163
Abstract
This article examines the Swedish test translation of Luke9:51–19:28 and Galatians, which was published by the Swedish Bible Society in2015. It analyzes how and to what extent the translators apply the fundamentaltranslation principle (moderate formal equivalence) and the six translationdirectives (on concordance, figures of speech, rhythm, modern language,gender-inclusive language, and faithfulness towards cultural differences) setforth by the Bible Society. It also compares the translation with a currentinternational discussion on Bible translation. Although the directives areoften ill-defined and too brief, the translators generally follow them satisfactorily.They could, however, have gone further in their application of concordance... (More)
This article examines the Swedish test translation of Luke9:51–19:28 and Galatians, which was published by the Swedish Bible Society in2015. It analyzes how and to what extent the translators apply the fundamentaltranslation principle (moderate formal equivalence) and the six translationdirectives (on concordance, figures of speech, rhythm, modern language,gender-inclusive language, and faithfulness towards cultural differences) setforth by the Bible Society. It also compares the translation with a currentinternational discussion on Bible translation. Although the directives areoften ill-defined and too brief, the translators generally follow them satisfactorily.They could, however, have gone further in their application of concordance andgender-inclusive language. The translation directive on rhythm is especiallydifficult to implement, since it is incomprehensible without a broaderdiscussion on sound quality, repetition, rhythm, and style and how these interactto convey the meaning of ancient texts, which were regularly composed for oraldelivery.

The Swedish BibleSociety has made a bold decision—and one that is warranted by conclusions drawnfrom an international discussion on Bible translation—in aiming for a moderatefunctional equivalent translation which employs gender-inclusive language of abasic type (when the meaning of the source text in clearly gender-inclusive,even if it is expressed with gender-specific language). Much remains to be donein terms of explaining why and how the next major Swedish Bible translationshould have these characteristics, yet from the reasoning in this article thedecision is both timely and accurate. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bibelöversättning, bibeltolkning, Bibeln, Nya Testamentet, översättning, Översättning av antik litteratur
in
Svensk Teologisk Kvartalskrift
volume
91
issue
4
pages
10 pages
publisher
Gleerups Utbildning AB
ISSN
0039-6761
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
ed4c61c7-8c5f-4327-a7da-a233f96a1f50
date added to LUP
2016-06-08 12:42:42
date last changed
2016-06-09 08:18:51
@misc{ed4c61c7-8c5f-4327-a7da-a233f96a1f50,
  abstract     = {This article examines the Swedish test translation of Luke9:51–19:28 and Galatians, which was published by the Swedish Bible Society in2015. It analyzes how and to what extent the translators apply the fundamentaltranslation principle (moderate formal equivalence) and the six translationdirectives (on concordance, figures of speech, rhythm, modern language,gender-inclusive language, and faithfulness towards cultural differences) setforth by the Bible Society. It also compares the translation with a currentinternational discussion on Bible translation. Although the directives areoften ill-defined and too brief, the translators generally follow them satisfactorily.They could, however, have gone further in their application of concordance andgender-inclusive language. The translation directive on rhythm is especiallydifficult to implement, since it is incomprehensible without a broaderdiscussion on sound quality, repetition, rhythm, and style and how these interactto convey the meaning of ancient texts, which were regularly composed for oraldelivery.<br/><br/>The Swedish BibleSociety has made a bold decision—and one that is warranted by conclusions drawnfrom an international discussion on Bible translation—in aiming for a moderatefunctional equivalent translation which employs gender-inclusive language of abasic type (when the meaning of the source text in clearly gender-inclusive,even if it is expressed with gender-specific language). Much remains to be donein terms of explaining why and how the next major Swedish Bible translationshould have these characteristics, yet from the reasoning in this article thedecision is both timely and accurate.},
  author       = {Nässelqvist, Dan},
  issn         = {0039-6761},
  keyword      = {bibelöversättning,bibeltolkning,Bibeln,Nya Testamentet,översättning,Översättning av antik litteratur},
  language     = {swe},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {154--163},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb488610)},
  series       = {Svensk Teologisk Kvartalskrift},
  title        = {Svenska Bibelsällskapets provöversättning i ett internationellt perspektiv},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2015},
}