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Self-perceived oral health in adolescents associated with family characteristics and parental employment status

Östberg, A-L; Lindblad, U and Halling, Anders LU (2003) In Community Dental Health 20(3). p.159-164
Abstract
Objective To investigate self-perceived oral health and its associations with family characteristics and parental employment status in an adolescent population from a gender perspective. Design A cross-sectional study using self-reported questionnaires answered anonymously in classrooms. Setting All senior (13-15 years) and upper secondary (16-18 years) level schools in Skaraborg County, Sweden Subjects 17,035 students, participation rate 88.5%. Outcome measures A single-item rating of self-perceived oral health; satisfaction with the appearance of the teeth; self-assessed gingival bleeding; a perceived oral health index. Results Independent of family characteristics and parental employment status, girls, more often than boys, perceived... (More)
Objective To investigate self-perceived oral health and its associations with family characteristics and parental employment status in an adolescent population from a gender perspective. Design A cross-sectional study using self-reported questionnaires answered anonymously in classrooms. Setting All senior (13-15 years) and upper secondary (16-18 years) level schools in Skaraborg County, Sweden Subjects 17,035 students, participation rate 88.5%. Outcome measures A single-item rating of self-perceived oral health; satisfaction with the appearance of the teeth; self-assessed gingival bleeding; a perceived oral health index. Results Independent of family characteristics and parental employment status, girls, more often than boys, perceived their oral health to be good and had less self-assessed gingival bleeding but were less satisfied with the appearance of their teeth. Adolescents living with a single mother (senior level odds ratios OR 0.71 [Confidence Interval CI 0.59,0.84], upper secondary level OR 0.76 [CI 0.62,0.92]) or with neither parent were less likely to perceive their oral health as good when single-item rated and reported more gingival bleeding (living with a single mother; senior level OR 1.37 [CI 1.20,1.57], upper secondary level OR 1.51 [CI 1.28,1.77]) than those who lived with broth parents, while adolescents who lived with a single father did not. Associations between parental employment status and self-perceived oral health were weak and inconsistent. Conclusions Family characteristics were important for adolescents' self-perceived oral health while parental employment status was not. Children living in single-parent households should be supported and recognised in strategies for oral health promotion and prevention. Gender differences should also be taken into consideration. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Community Dental Health
volume
20
issue
3
pages
159 - 164
publisher
FDI World Dental Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0141996925
ISSN
0265-539X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bcd3ddfc-ba35-413d-b844-e2071440678b (old id 1127974)
date added to LUP
2008-06-04 13:06:39
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:14:00
@article{bcd3ddfc-ba35-413d-b844-e2071440678b,
  abstract     = {Objective To investigate self-perceived oral health and its associations with family characteristics and parental employment status in an adolescent population from a gender perspective. Design A cross-sectional study using self-reported questionnaires answered anonymously in classrooms. Setting All senior (13-15 years) and upper secondary (16-18 years) level schools in Skaraborg County, Sweden Subjects 17,035 students, participation rate 88.5%. Outcome measures A single-item rating of self-perceived oral health; satisfaction with the appearance of the teeth; self-assessed gingival bleeding; a perceived oral health index. Results Independent of family characteristics and parental employment status, girls, more often than boys, perceived their oral health to be good and had less self-assessed gingival bleeding but were less satisfied with the appearance of their teeth. Adolescents living with a single mother (senior level odds ratios OR 0.71 [Confidence Interval CI 0.59,0.84], upper secondary level OR 0.76 [CI 0.62,0.92]) or with neither parent were less likely to perceive their oral health as good when single-item rated and reported more gingival bleeding (living with a single mother; senior level OR 1.37 [CI 1.20,1.57], upper secondary level OR 1.51 [CI 1.28,1.77]) than those who lived with broth parents, while adolescents who lived with a single father did not. Associations between parental employment status and self-perceived oral health were weak and inconsistent. Conclusions Family characteristics were important for adolescents' self-perceived oral health while parental employment status was not. Children living in single-parent households should be supported and recognised in strategies for oral health promotion and prevention. Gender differences should also be taken into consideration.},
  author       = {Östberg, A-L and Lindblad, U and Halling, Anders},
  issn         = {0265-539X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {159--164},
  publisher    = {FDI World Dental Press},
  series       = {Community Dental Health},
  title        = {Self-perceived oral health in adolescents associated with family characteristics and parental employment status},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2003},
}