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The Anti-Nomadic Bias of Political Theory

Ringmar, Erik LU (2017) In Nomad-State Relationships in International Relations: Before and After Borders
Abstract (Swedish)
It was more than anything by rejecting the lives lived by nomadic peoples that the state came to be seen as legitimate. In the rhetoric of political theorists, the state is legitimate since it is required by Nature, by History and by God. The state is thrice-born, thrice necessary. The Nature which we find inside us demands it, but so does the Nature in which we find ourselves. History, understood as the process by which we come to fulfill our telos, as individuals and as societies, shows the state to be inevitable. And meanwhile God, hovering in the firmament, is overseeing the whole process, making devout believers out of those who fail to be convinced by rational arguments. Quod erat demonstrandum: nomads and a nomadic way of life are... (More)
It was more than anything by rejecting the lives lived by nomadic peoples that the state came to be seen as legitimate. In the rhetoric of political theorists, the state is legitimate since it is required by Nature, by History and by God. The state is thrice-born, thrice necessary. The Nature which we find inside us demands it, but so does the Nature in which we find ourselves. History, understood as the process by which we come to fulfill our telos, as individuals and as societies, shows the state to be inevitable. And meanwhile God, hovering in the firmament, is overseeing the whole process, making devout believers out of those who fail to be convinced by rational arguments. Quod erat demonstrandum: nomads and a nomadic way of life are against Nature, against History and against God. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
nomads, nomadic life, pastoralists, hunters and gatherers, political theory, state formation, state building, Plato, Aristototle, Hobbes, Locke, Adam Ferguson
in
Nomad-State Relationships in International Relations: Before and After Borders
publisher
Palgrave
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
60bd76f0-4ef9-4fbf-8eb1-d7f144f84432
date added to LUP
2017-05-02 05:18:10
date last changed
2017-09-25 08:15:35
@inbook{60bd76f0-4ef9-4fbf-8eb1-d7f144f84432,
  abstract     = {It was more than anything by rejecting the lives lived by nomadic peoples that the state came to be seen as legitimate. In the rhetoric of political theorists, the state is legitimate since it is required by Nature, by History and by God. The state is thrice-born, thrice necessary. The Nature which we find inside us demands it, but so does the Nature in which we find ourselves. History, understood as the process by which we come to fulfill our telos, as individuals and as societies, shows the state to be inevitable. And meanwhile God, hovering in the firmament, is overseeing the whole process, making devout believers out of those who fail to be convinced by rational arguments. Quod erat demonstrandum: nomads and a nomadic way of life are against Nature, against History and against God.},
  author       = {Ringmar, Erik},
  keyword      = {nomads,nomadic life,pastoralists,hunters and gatherers,political theory,state formation,state building,Plato,Aristototle,Hobbes,Locke,Adam Ferguson},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Palgrave},
  series       = {Nomad-State Relationships in International Relations: Before and After Borders},
  title        = {The Anti-Nomadic Bias of Political Theory},
  year         = {2017},
}