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Order in a Borderless World: Nomads Confront Globalization

Ringmar, Erik LU (2016) In [Host publication title missing]
Abstract
As a result of globalization societies become more prosperous and their relations more peaceful, but people also come to live more nomadic lives. We become increasingly homeless, as it were, and consequently more susceptible to the arguments of politicians who promise to create new homes for us. This is how the “first era of globalization” in the nineteenth-century was interrupted and replaced by a century of genocides and wars. For the past couple of decades we have been going through a new, “second,” era of globalization, and once again the result is economic development and peace, but also a renewed rhetoric of homelessness. The terrifying prospect is that we will repeat the horrors of the twentieth-century. As I argue in this chapter,... (More)
As a result of globalization societies become more prosperous and their relations more peaceful, but people also come to live more nomadic lives. We become increasingly homeless, as it were, and consequently more susceptible to the arguments of politicians who promise to create new homes for us. This is how the “first era of globalization” in the nineteenth-century was interrupted and replaced by a century of genocides and wars. For the past couple of decades we have been going through a new, “second,” era of globalization, and once again the result is economic development and peace, but also a renewed rhetoric of homelessness. The terrifying prospect is that we will repeat the horrors of the twentieth-century. As I argue in this chapter, we need to learn to live with rootlessness, and who better to teach us how to do it than nomads? Nomads have no roots, they have paths; they have homes of course, but homes that they take with them. We too must learn to carry everything we need with us. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
submitted
subject
keywords
nomadic societies, globalization, world history, Mongols, nineteenth-century history, home, homelessness, Kipling, Chesterton
in
[Host publication title missing]
editor
Hellman, Gunther and
publisher
Oxford University Press
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
301c4cf4-99e9-4e5c-bceb-24ecee4cf85a (old id 8837860)
date added to LUP
2016-03-07 12:26:30
date last changed
2017-06-08 11:34:31
@inbook{301c4cf4-99e9-4e5c-bceb-24ecee4cf85a,
  abstract     = {As a result of globalization societies become more prosperous and their relations more peaceful, but people also come to live more nomadic lives. We become increasingly homeless, as it were, and consequently more susceptible to the arguments of politicians who promise to create new homes for us. This is how the “first era of globalization” in the nineteenth-century was interrupted and replaced by a century of genocides and wars. For the past couple of decades we have been going through a new, “second,” era of globalization, and once again the result is economic development and peace, but also a renewed rhetoric of homelessness. The terrifying prospect is that we will repeat the horrors of the twentieth-century. As I argue in this chapter, we need to learn to live with rootlessness, and who better to teach us how to do it than nomads? Nomads have no roots, they have paths; they have homes of course, but homes that they take with them. We too must learn to carry everything we need with us.},
  author       = {Ringmar, Erik},
  editor       = {Hellman, Gunther},
  keyword      = {nomadic societies,globalization,world history,Mongols,nineteenth-century history,home,homelessness,Kipling,Chesterton},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {[Host publication title missing]},
  title        = {Order in a Borderless World: Nomads Confront Globalization},
  year         = {2016},
}