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CAVE CANEM : En undersökning av hundmosaiker i Pompeji

Kärfve, Fanny (2008)
Classical archaeology and ancient history
Abstract
The aim of this essay is to examine four floor mosaics from private dwellings in Pompeii. These 1st century floor mosaics decorate the fauces of the houses and they all depict watchdogs. The first question to be asked is if there are other common features between the houses that can explain why these house owners chose this figure. The second question is if you can reveal, from the existing knowledge about the house owners, the same information. The third question to be asked is if the watchdog mosaics have anything to do with the location of the houses in Pompeii. The final question to be asked is whether or not the symbol of the watchdog contains more serious meaning than previously has been expected.

The four mosaics presented in the... (More)
The aim of this essay is to examine four floor mosaics from private dwellings in Pompeii. These 1st century floor mosaics decorate the fauces of the houses and they all depict watchdogs. The first question to be asked is if there are other common features between the houses that can explain why these house owners chose this figure. The second question is if you can reveal, from the existing knowledge about the house owners, the same information. The third question to be asked is if the watchdog mosaics have anything to do with the location of the houses in Pompeii. The final question to be asked is whether or not the symbol of the watchdog contains more serious meaning than previously has been expected.

The four mosaics presented in the catalogue have been examined by means of a comparative method of analysis. They share common features such as the date and the execution in a black-and-white technique. Furthermore, there are red details on the mosaics, and the red colour probably functions as an apotropaia against the Evil Eye.

The houses are as follow: the House of Paquius Proculus, I.7.1, the House of Caecilius Iucundus, V.1.26, the House of the Tragic Poet, VI.8.3 and the House of Orpheus, VI.14.20. The owners of these houses were all, of what we know, respectable and significant citizens of Pompeii. The four houses were lavishly decorated with floor mosaics and frescoes and they were all located on main streets of Pompeii.

The member of the Roman society had to avoid other people's envy and in particular the Evil Eye. The dog played an important role in ancient believes and superstition and was thought of as a guardian against evil. With this danger in mind, it is likely that the Romans chose to decorate the fauces of the houses with a watchdog mosaic, as to serve as an apotropaic talisman and to protect the house from envy. (Less)
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author
Kärfve, Fanny
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
mosaics, fauces, watchdog, apotropaism, the Evil Eye, mosaiker, vakthund, onda ögat, Ancient history, Antikens och forntidens historia, Archaeology, Arkeologi
language
Swedish
id
1317289
date added to LUP
2008-05-23
date last changed
2008-05-23
@misc{1317289,
  abstract     = {The aim of this essay is to examine four floor mosaics from private dwellings in Pompeii. These 1st century floor mosaics decorate the fauces of the houses and they all depict watchdogs. The first question to be asked is if there are other common features between the houses that can explain why these house owners chose this figure. The second question is if you can reveal, from the existing knowledge about the house owners, the same information. The third question to be asked is if the watchdog mosaics have anything to do with the location of the houses in Pompeii. The final question to be asked is whether or not the symbol of the watchdog contains more serious meaning than previously has been expected.

The four mosaics presented in the catalogue have been examined by means of a comparative method of analysis. They share common features such as the date and the execution in a black-and-white technique. Furthermore, there are red details on the mosaics, and the red colour probably functions as an apotropaia against the Evil Eye.

The houses are as follow: the House of Paquius Proculus, I.7.1, the House of Caecilius Iucundus, V.1.26, the House of the Tragic Poet, VI.8.3 and the House of Orpheus, VI.14.20. The owners of these houses were all, of what we know, respectable and significant citizens of Pompeii. The four houses were lavishly decorated with floor mosaics and frescoes and they were all located on main streets of Pompeii.

The member of the Roman society had to avoid other people's envy and in particular the Evil Eye. The dog played an important role in ancient believes and superstition and was thought of as a guardian against evil. With this danger in mind, it is likely that the Romans chose to decorate the fauces of the houses with a watchdog mosaic, as to serve as an apotropaic talisman and to protect the house from envy.},
  author       = {Kärfve, Fanny},
  keyword      = {mosaics,fauces,watchdog,apotropaism,the Evil Eye,mosaiker,vakthund,onda ögat,Ancient history,Antikens och forntidens historia,Archaeology,Arkeologi},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {CAVE CANEM : En undersökning av hundmosaiker i Pompeji},
  year         = {2008},
}