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Lean Warehousing - Gaining from Lean thinking in Warehousing

Tostar, Martin and Karlsson, Per (2008)
Packaging Logistics
Abstract
This master thesis has been written during the autumn of 2007 and in the month of

January 2008. It investigates how the Lean philosophy can be used in Warehousing

businesses. Further it gives example of tools that can help Warehousing companies to

become Leaner in their business.

There is a contradiction between Lean Thinking and Warehousing practice today,

since Lean strive at being just in time with a pull flow with no batching production

and with preferably no inventory kept between the different processes. This is an

ideal scenario. In real life there exist variation in demand, uncertainty in lead time and

long lead times that cannot be fully predicted. This makes a warehouse necessary to

provide items to the production,... (More)
This master thesis has been written during the autumn of 2007 and in the month of

January 2008. It investigates how the Lean philosophy can be used in Warehousing

businesses. Further it gives example of tools that can help Warehousing companies to

become Leaner in their business.

There is a contradiction between Lean Thinking and Warehousing practice today,

since Lean strive at being just in time with a pull flow with no batching production

and with preferably no inventory kept between the different processes. This is an

ideal scenario. In real life there exist variation in demand, uncertainty in lead time and

long lead times that cannot be fully predicted. This makes a warehouse necessary to

provide items to the production, assembling or customer in time.

The warehouses doesn?t add any extra value to the items themselves but only to

customers by giving it in the time that the customer wants it, in the right amount and

in the right quality. This makes the processes in the warehouse that is necessary for

maintaining that ability; necessary non-value added processes. The other processes

that aren?t necessary are just non-value added processes. The warehouse can also be

preferred for distribution purposes. But since nothing the warehouse do with the item

gives it more value in monetary terminology, little handling of the item as possible is

to be preferred. But as mentioned before there are necessary non value added

processes and there are those who are just non value added. The goal is to avoid the

non value added activities and improve the necessary non-value added processes if

they can?t be avoided as well.

One way to improve the necessary value added process picking is to place the items

in a matter that reduce the work for the picker when picking. It could be placing them

in appropriate heights and on picking frequency to reduce travel time. This could be

done by an ABC-classification on the picking frequency and dividing the picking area

into zones depending on the ABC.

Another way to improve the picking process is to visualize and assign the workload

as optimal as possible. This could be done with the Heijunka concept together with

the shipping order logic. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Tostar, Martin and Karlsson, Per
supervisor
organization
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Lean Warehousing, Warehousing, ABC-analysis, Heijunka, Lean Thinking, Technological sciences, Teknik
language
English
id
1318640
date added to LUP
2008-06-05
date last changed
2010-02-01 14:40:03
@misc{1318640,
  abstract     = {This master thesis has been written during the autumn of 2007 and in the month of

January 2008. It investigates how the Lean philosophy can be used in Warehousing

businesses. Further it gives example of tools that can help Warehousing companies to

become Leaner in their business.

There is a contradiction between Lean Thinking and Warehousing practice today,

since Lean strive at being just in time with a pull flow with no batching production

and with preferably no inventory kept between the different processes. This is an

ideal scenario. In real life there exist variation in demand, uncertainty in lead time and

long lead times that cannot be fully predicted. This makes a warehouse necessary to

provide items to the production, assembling or customer in time.

The warehouses doesn?t add any extra value to the items themselves but only to

customers by giving it in the time that the customer wants it, in the right amount and

in the right quality. This makes the processes in the warehouse that is necessary for

maintaining that ability; necessary non-value added processes. The other processes

that aren?t necessary are just non-value added processes. The warehouse can also be

preferred for distribution purposes. But since nothing the warehouse do with the item

gives it more value in monetary terminology, little handling of the item as possible is

to be preferred. But as mentioned before there are necessary non value added

processes and there are those who are just non value added. The goal is to avoid the

non value added activities and improve the necessary non-value added processes if

they can?t be avoided as well.

One way to improve the necessary value added process picking is to place the items

in a matter that reduce the work for the picker when picking. It could be placing them

in appropriate heights and on picking frequency to reduce travel time. This could be

done by an ABC-classification on the picking frequency and dividing the picking area

into zones depending on the ABC.

Another way to improve the picking process is to visualize and assign the workload

as optimal as possible. This could be done with the Heijunka concept together with

the shipping order logic.},
  author       = {Tostar, Martin and Karlsson, Per},
  keyword      = {Lean Warehousing,Warehousing,ABC-analysis,Heijunka,Lean Thinking,Technological sciences,Teknik},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Lean Warehousing - Gaining from Lean thinking in Warehousing},
  year         = {2008},
}