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De djupaste ärren är dem vi inte ser: en kvalitativ studie av några professionella behandlares tolkningar av självskadebeteende, med fokus på kroppen

Modig, Matilda and Wiklöf, Lina (2008)
School of Social Work
Abstract
This study will focus on how patients that suffer from self-injurious behaviours experience the relation between their self and body according to some professionals. The purpose is to enlighten why a person who has mental problems chooses to injure his or her body. We believe that the reason behind this is based on the early attachment between the parent and child. We also believe that a person only continues with this behaviour if he or she gains from it. The research questions this study raises are:

· How does a person with self-injurious behaviour experience the relationship between their body and their self?

· What is the effect of self-injurious behaviour on the body and what is the effect on the relationship between their body and... (More)
This study will focus on how patients that suffer from self-injurious behaviours experience the relation between their self and body according to some professionals. The purpose is to enlighten why a person who has mental problems chooses to injure his or her body. We believe that the reason behind this is based on the early attachment between the parent and child. We also believe that a person only continues with this behaviour if he or she gains from it. The research questions this study raises are:

· How does a person with self-injurious behaviour experience the relationship between their body and their self?

· What is the effect of self-injurious behaviour on the body and what is the effect on the relationship between their body and their self.

· How did the relationship between body and self evolve?

This study is qualitative and is based on interviews from our respondents of whom all work or have worked with self-injurious behavioural patients. The results show that patients who suffer from this behaviour often have a poor connection with their attachment figure. This has the consequence of detachment from his or her body and emotions. When a patient has anxiety he or she needs to connect with the body again and therefore injures themselves. We have found that there are two different groups of self-injurious behavioural patients; one group who suffers from a mental illness and one group who does not. The first group has deeper problems and is a very difficult group to treat. They easily reach a very high level of anxiety which they try to release through this behaviour. The patient therefore experience that the self-injurious behaviour is a solution and does not see it as a problem. The second group is not usually based on such difficult emotional detachments and is therefore not as difficult to treat. We believe that people who have self-injury behaviour need therapy but also need to learn how to reconnect with their body through physiotherapy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Modig, Matilda and Wiklöf, Lina
supervisor
organization
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
självskadebeteende, kroppen, anknytning, borderline, Social sciences, Samhällsvetenskaper
language
Swedish
id
1320180
date added to LUP
2008-10-21
date last changed
2008-10-21
@misc{1320180,
  abstract     = {This study will focus on how patients that suffer from self-injurious behaviours experience the relation between their self and body according to some professionals. The purpose is to enlighten why a person who has mental problems chooses to injure his or her body. We believe that the reason behind this is based on the early attachment between the parent and child. We also believe that a person only continues with this behaviour if he or she gains from it. The research questions this study raises are:

· How does a person with self-injurious behaviour experience the relationship between their body and their self?

· What is the effect of self-injurious behaviour on the body and what is the effect on the relationship between their body and their self.

· How did the relationship between body and self evolve?

This study is qualitative and is based on interviews from our respondents of whom all work or have worked with self-injurious behavioural patients. The results show that patients who suffer from this behaviour often have a poor connection with their attachment figure. This has the consequence of detachment from his or her body and emotions. When a patient has anxiety he or she needs to connect with the body again and therefore injures themselves. We have found that there are two different groups of self-injurious behavioural patients; one group who suffers from a mental illness and one group who does not. The first group has deeper problems and is a very difficult group to treat. They easily reach a very high level of anxiety which they try to release through this behaviour. The patient therefore experience that the self-injurious behaviour is a solution and does not see it as a problem. The second group is not usually based on such difficult emotional detachments and is therefore not as difficult to treat. We believe that people who have self-injury behaviour need therapy but also need to learn how to reconnect with their body through physiotherapy.},
  author       = {Modig, Matilda and Wiklöf, Lina},
  keyword      = {självskadebeteende,kroppen,anknytning,borderline,Social sciences,Samhällsvetenskaper},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {De djupaste ärren är dem vi inte ser: en kvalitativ studie av några professionella behandlares tolkningar av självskadebeteende, med fokus på kroppen},
  year         = {2008},
}