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Why the United States' coercive diplomacy against North Korea failed

Brattström, Erik (2007)
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Coercive diplomacy, applied as a strategy, is constituted by diplomatic

negotiations combined with threats of, or the actual use of limited military force, as a way of backing the negotiations. The purpose of this paper is to (1) examine if the United States' attempts from January 2001 until October 2006, to persuade North Korea to disarm and reverse its nuclear weapon programmes, was a case of

coercive diplomacy. But I also, and more importantly, set out to (2) find

explanations to why the U.S. failed in its effort to get North Korea to comply with this demand, during the same period of time. I will carry out these aims through a case study guided by the theoretical framework of coercive diplomacy. I argue that the United States'... (More)
Coercive diplomacy, applied as a strategy, is constituted by diplomatic

negotiations combined with threats of, or the actual use of limited military force, as a way of backing the negotiations. The purpose of this paper is to (1) examine if the United States' attempts from January 2001 until October 2006, to persuade North Korea to disarm and reverse its nuclear weapon programmes, was a case of

coercive diplomacy. But I also, and more importantly, set out to (2) find

explanations to why the U.S. failed in its effort to get North Korea to comply with this demand, during the same period of time. I will carry out these aims through a case study guided by the theoretical framework of coercive diplomacy. I argue that the United States' strategy to get North Korea into compliance indeed was a case of coercive diplomacy. And that the US failed due to the lack of fulfilment of

the core conditions that favour a successful implementation of coercive

diplomacy. (Less)
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author
Brattström, Erik
supervisor
organization
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Coercive diplomacy, U.S., North Korea, Nuclear weapons, Disarmament, Social sciences, Samhällsvetenskaper
language
English
id
1324890
date added to LUP
2007-09-05 00:00:00
date last changed
2015-12-14 13:34:36
@misc{1324890,
  abstract     = {Coercive diplomacy, applied as a strategy, is constituted by diplomatic

negotiations combined with threats of, or the actual use of limited military force, as a way of backing the negotiations. The purpose of this paper is to (1) examine if the United States' attempts from January 2001 until October 2006, to persuade North Korea to disarm and reverse its nuclear weapon programmes, was a case of

coercive diplomacy. But I also, and more importantly, set out to (2) find

explanations to why the U.S. failed in its effort to get North Korea to comply with this demand, during the same period of time. I will carry out these aims through a case study guided by the theoretical framework of coercive diplomacy. I argue that the United States' strategy to get North Korea into compliance indeed was a case of coercive diplomacy. And that the US failed due to the lack of fulfilment of

the core conditions that favour a successful implementation of coercive

diplomacy.},
  author       = {Brattström, Erik},
  keyword      = {Coercive diplomacy,U.S.,North Korea,Nuclear weapons,Disarmament,Social sciences,Samhällsvetenskaper},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Why the United States' coercive diplomacy against North Korea failed},
  year         = {2007},
}