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Human Inspection Work: A case study of why faults are missed?

Lindblad, Magnus (2006)
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Visual inspection in order to assure quality control is a challenging field that is attracting increasing interest after a long period of silence due to the trust and hope in computers and automation. Human visual inspection is however a challenging area as it requires the designer of the system to take in to account demands and limitations of technical, economic and psychological nature.

This study was conducted in a real world setting in cooperation with a company with manufacturing in East Asia. Semi-participant observations were used to study the work in the factory. The results from the study highlight the tremendous importance of not only taking the usual economical and technological considerations when designing a human inspection... (More)
Visual inspection in order to assure quality control is a challenging field that is attracting increasing interest after a long period of silence due to the trust and hope in computers and automation. Human visual inspection is however a challenging area as it requires the designer of the system to take in to account demands and limitations of technical, economic and psychological nature.

This study was conducted in a real world setting in cooperation with a company with manufacturing in East Asia. Semi-participant observations were used to study the work in the factory. The results from the study highlight the tremendous importance of not only taking the usual economical and technological considerations when designing a human inspection system. Humans have demands and limitations that the inspection/test system has to be adapted to.

Human inspection/test performance was found to have large individual differences. The overall performance tended however to decline over the work shift although a main effect could not be statistically secured (p = .060). Paired samples t-test showed on the other hand significant results between work shift periods 1-3 and 2-3 and was very close between 1-4 (p = .052). Performance was also impaired by reduced test times as the correlation results show (rs = -.48, p = .001, 1-tailed).

This research has also pointed out the danger with monotonous work tasks due to habituation and expectancy effects and the subsequent need for stimulation in the work situation. The results also highlight the need for autonomy, goals and feedback to improve motivation and so performance. (Less)
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author
Lindblad, Magnus
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
inspection, motivation, stimulation, quality, vigilance, stress, arousal, perception, human error, Industrial psychology, Arbetspsykologi, industripsykologi
language
English
id
1327412
date added to LUP
2006-06-22
date last changed
2007-01-03
@misc{1327412,
  abstract     = {Visual inspection in order to assure quality control is a challenging field that is attracting increasing interest after a long period of silence due to the trust and hope in computers and automation. Human visual inspection is however a challenging area as it requires the designer of the system to take in to account demands and limitations of technical, economic and psychological nature.

This study was conducted in a real world setting in cooperation with a company with manufacturing in East Asia. Semi-participant observations were used to study the work in the factory. The results from the study highlight the tremendous importance of not only taking the usual economical and technological considerations when designing a human inspection system. Humans have demands and limitations that the inspection/test system has to be adapted to.

Human inspection/test performance was found to have large individual differences. The overall performance tended however to decline over the work shift although a main effect could not be statistically secured (p = .060). Paired samples t-test showed on the other hand significant results between work shift periods 1-3 and 2-3 and was very close between 1-4 (p = .052). Performance was also impaired by reduced test times as the correlation results show (rs = -.48, p = .001, 1-tailed).

This research has also pointed out the danger with monotonous work tasks due to habituation and expectancy effects and the subsequent need for stimulation in the work situation. The results also highlight the need for autonomy, goals and feedback to improve motivation and so performance.},
  author       = {Lindblad, Magnus},
  keyword      = {inspection,motivation,stimulation,quality,vigilance,stress,arousal,perception,human error,Industrial psychology,Arbetspsykologi, industripsykologi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Human Inspection Work: A case study of why faults are missed?},
  year         = {2006},
}