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Hundar kring benen. En analys av belastning och storleksvariation hos hundarna i det mesolitiska Skåne

Petersson, Nina (2006)
Historical Osteology
Abstract
This paper deals with variations in the osteological material of dog (Canis familiaris L.) from the Mesolithic Scania, southern Sweden. The general aim is to discuss the use and specialisation of dog during the period, and differences or relations between cultures and traditions within the Mesolithic period. The study is based on a analysis of the bone material from the sites; Ageröd I:A-D, Ageröd I:H-C, Bredasten, Bökeberg III, Hög, Löddesborg, Ringsjöholm, Segebro, Sjöholmen, Skateholm I-II and Tågerup, phase 1-3, with datings from Late Maglemose Culture to Early Ertebølle Culture. The seminar paper also includes descriptive statistics of the osteometrical data of Denmark, from several studies of Degerbøhl (1927) and Noe-Nygaard (1995,... (More)
This paper deals with variations in the osteological material of dog (Canis familiaris L.) from the Mesolithic Scania, southern Sweden. The general aim is to discuss the use and specialisation of dog during the period, and differences or relations between cultures and traditions within the Mesolithic period. The study is based on a analysis of the bone material from the sites; Ageröd I:A-D, Ageröd I:H-C, Bredasten, Bökeberg III, Hög, Löddesborg, Ringsjöholm, Segebro, Sjöholmen, Skateholm I-II and Tågerup, phase 1-3, with datings from Late Maglemose Culture to Early Ertebølle Culture. The seminar paper also includes descriptive statistics of the osteometrical data of Denmark, from several studies of Degerbøhl (1927) and Noe-Nygaard (1995, 2003). The study is focused on the relation between size, robusticity, muscle grooves and ligaments of mandibula, tibia, radius, humerus, femur and metacarpalia/metatarsalia. Osteometric analyses show differences in body size within the Late Maglemose- and Kongemose Culture, but the variation may

be related to sexual dimorphism. The osteometrical data of the bone remains from the Ertebølle Culture indicates three sizes of dogs. The expressions of muscle grooves indicate different use and different types of work load between and within the sites. The variation is concentrated to the muscle

groups pronator and extensor which affect stretching and bending of the digits, elbow and knee. The variation is connected to conditions of locomotion and musculoskeletal stress and indicates different usage of dogs. The burial ground of Skateholm I-II demonstrates that the variation in locomotion is connected to body size, while the dogs robusticity do not correlate wiht size. The dogs of early

Mesolithic is as large as the dogs of the Ertebølle Culture, but smaller types of dogs coexist, according to the bone remains, during the Ertebølle Culture. Specialised hunting, guarding or social symbols, the different functions of the dog during the Mesolithic period is hard to reach, but this study shows that there are differences in both mechanical stress and sizes of dogs. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Petersson, Nina
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Arkeologi - Sverige - Skåne, Mesolitisk tid, Animalosteologi, Prehistory, Förhistoria
language
Swedish
id
1329319
date added to LUP
2006-09-06
date last changed
2006-09-06
@misc{1329319,
  abstract     = {This paper deals with variations in the osteological material of dog (Canis familiaris L.) from the Mesolithic Scania, southern Sweden. The general aim is to discuss the use and specialisation of dog during the period, and differences or relations between cultures and traditions within the Mesolithic period. The study is based on a analysis of the bone material from the sites; Ageröd I:A-D, Ageröd I:H-C, Bredasten, Bökeberg III, Hög, Löddesborg, Ringsjöholm, Segebro, Sjöholmen, Skateholm I-II and Tågerup, phase 1-3, with datings from Late Maglemose Culture to Early Ertebølle Culture. The seminar paper also includes descriptive statistics of the osteometrical data of Denmark, from several studies of Degerbøhl (1927) and Noe-Nygaard (1995, 2003). The study is focused on the relation between size, robusticity, muscle grooves and ligaments of mandibula, tibia, radius, humerus, femur and metacarpalia/metatarsalia. Osteometric analyses show differences in body size within the Late Maglemose- and Kongemose Culture, but the variation may

be related to sexual dimorphism. The osteometrical data of the bone remains from the Ertebølle Culture indicates three sizes of dogs. The expressions of muscle grooves indicate different use and different types of work load between and within the sites. The variation is concentrated to the muscle

groups pronator and extensor which affect stretching and bending of the digits, elbow and knee. The variation is connected to conditions of locomotion and musculoskeletal stress and indicates different usage of dogs. The burial ground of Skateholm I-II demonstrates that the variation in locomotion is connected to body size, while the dogs robusticity do not correlate wiht size. The dogs of early

Mesolithic is as large as the dogs of the Ertebølle Culture, but smaller types of dogs coexist, according to the bone remains, during the Ertebølle Culture. Specialised hunting, guarding or social symbols, the different functions of the dog during the Mesolithic period is hard to reach, but this study shows that there are differences in both mechanical stress and sizes of dogs.},
  author       = {Petersson, Nina},
  keyword      = {Arkeologi - Sverige - Skåne,Mesolitisk tid,Animalosteologi,Prehistory,Förhistoria},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Hundar kring benen. En analys av belastning och storleksvariation hos hundarna i det mesolitiska Skåne},
  year         = {2006},
}