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Corruption and Female Official Representation in Developing States - do women counteract political corruption?

Vollmer, Nina (2005)
Department of Political Science
Abstract
The purpose of this essay is to investigate the validity of the hypothesis that there is a negative relationship between female official representation and the level of corruption in developing states. The possibility of a reversed causality is also considered. This is done through statistical analysis combined with a theoretical framework.

The results show a weak relationship between the level of women in parliament and the level of corruption, although other factors seem to have a stronger explanatory force. From the analysis of the results it is indicated that it is a case of a circular relationship between a multitude of factors where an augmentation in one sector creates favourable conditions for the other factors and thus creating a... (More)
The purpose of this essay is to investigate the validity of the hypothesis that there is a negative relationship between female official representation and the level of corruption in developing states. The possibility of a reversed causality is also considered. This is done through statistical analysis combined with a theoretical framework.

The results show a weak relationship between the level of women in parliament and the level of corruption, although other factors seem to have a stronger explanatory force. From the analysis of the results it is indicated that it is a case of a circular relationship between a multitude of factors where an augmentation in one sector creates favourable conditions for the other factors and thus creating a cycle of effects that can be both positive and negative.

It is also argued that previous studies on this issue have not taken into consideration the different societal and political conditions that developing states face compared to highly developed states and that the conclusions drawn from these studies might not be fully applicable on this set of countries. (Less)
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author
Vollmer, Nina
supervisor
organization
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Corruption, Gender, Women in the legislature, Developing Countries, Cross-national, Political and administrative sciences, Statsvetenskap, förvaltningskunskap
language
English
id
1331833
date added to LUP
2005-06-20 00:00:00
date last changed
2005-06-20 00:00:00
@misc{1331833,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this essay is to investigate the validity of the hypothesis that there is a negative relationship between female official representation and the level of corruption in developing states. The possibility of a reversed causality is also considered. This is done through statistical analysis combined with a theoretical framework.

The results show a weak relationship between the level of women in parliament and the level of corruption, although other factors seem to have a stronger explanatory force. From the analysis of the results it is indicated that it is a case of a circular relationship between a multitude of factors where an augmentation in one sector creates favourable conditions for the other factors and thus creating a cycle of effects that can be both positive and negative.

It is also argued that previous studies on this issue have not taken into consideration the different societal and political conditions that developing states face compared to highly developed states and that the conclusions drawn from these studies might not be fully applicable on this set of countries.},
  author       = {Vollmer, Nina},
  keyword      = {Corruption,Gender,Women in the legislature,Developing Countries,Cross-national,Political and administrative sciences,Statsvetenskap, förvaltningskunskap},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Corruption and Female Official Representation in Developing States - do women counteract political corruption?},
  year         = {2005},
}