Advanced

Romkonferensens syn på terrorism

Sjöholm, Helena (2005)
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Abstract

In 1998 the United Nations held a diplomatic conference on the establishment of an International Criminal Court in Rome. In the end of the conference the negotiating states adopted the Rome Statute by which an international criminal court was established. The court, which entered into force on 1 July 2002, has jurisdiction over the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. The court also has jurisdiction over the crimes of aggression but the court will only be able to exercise its jurisdiction of this crime category when the member states of the court have found a definition of the crime.

In the draft statute, which was prepared before the conference, acts of terrorism were a proposed crime. With the... (More)
Abstract

In 1998 the United Nations held a diplomatic conference on the establishment of an International Criminal Court in Rome. In the end of the conference the negotiating states adopted the Rome Statute by which an international criminal court was established. The court, which entered into force on 1 July 2002, has jurisdiction over the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. The court also has jurisdiction over the crimes of aggression but the court will only be able to exercise its jurisdiction of this crime category when the member states of the court have found a definition of the crime.

In the draft statute, which was prepared before the conference, acts of terrorism were a proposed crime. With the starting-point in the Rome conference this essay studies how the working-definition of crimes of terrorism was elaborated in the draft statute and how the state delegations viewed the crime. This information is then compared with how international law, within the antiterrorist conventions, has conceptualised crimes of terrorism.

The main results are that the working definition of terrorism gave no general definition of terrorism: instead the crime was constituted by three different definitions and that, furthermore, the draft statute does not clearly define how accts of terrorism differ from other crimes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Sjöholm, Helena
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
The keywords are, International criminal court, terrorism,, international criminal law, international law,, Cherif Bassiouni., Political and administrative sciences, Statsvetenskap, förvaltningskunskap
language
Swedish
id
1332813
date added to LUP
2005-11-08 00:00:00
date last changed
2005-11-08 00:00:00
@misc{1332813,
  abstract     = {Abstract

In 1998 the United Nations held a diplomatic conference on the establishment of an International Criminal Court in Rome. In the end of the conference the negotiating states adopted the Rome Statute by which an international criminal court was established. The court, which entered into force on 1 July 2002, has jurisdiction over the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. The court also has jurisdiction over the crimes of aggression but the court will only be able to exercise its jurisdiction of this crime category when the member states of the court have found a definition of the crime.

In the draft statute, which was prepared before the conference, acts of terrorism were a proposed crime. With the starting-point in the Rome conference this essay studies how the working-definition of crimes of terrorism was elaborated in the draft statute and how the state delegations viewed the crime. This information is then compared with how international law, within the antiterrorist conventions, has conceptualised crimes of terrorism.

The main results are that the working definition of terrorism gave no general definition of terrorism: instead the crime was constituted by three different definitions and that, furthermore, the draft statute does not clearly define how accts of terrorism differ from other crimes.},
  author       = {Sjöholm, Helena},
  keyword      = {The keywords are,International criminal court, terrorism,,international criminal law, international law,,Cherif Bassiouni.,Political and administrative sciences,Statsvetenskap, förvaltningskunskap},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Romkonferensens syn på terrorism},
  year         = {2005},
}