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Effekter av ökad internationell handel på kvinnor kontra män

Stoltz, Maria (2008)
Department of Economics
Abstract
In the light of ever increasing international trade around the globe, affecting men and women in all countries, it is surprising that so little attention is given its gender effects. The effects of trade are said to be gender neutral, but could potentially act reinforcing on the existing gender patterns in a society. The aim of this thesis is to examine whether the implications for men and women in relation to trade liberalization can be found to differ. By stylizing some differences between men and women, this is done by examining the theoretical implications mainly via the Heckscher-Ohlin model and through a Beckerian approach. The implications found are then compared with the findings in existing empirical work. Illustrations... (More)
In the light of ever increasing international trade around the globe, affecting men and women in all countries, it is surprising that so little attention is given its gender effects. The effects of trade are said to be gender neutral, but could potentially act reinforcing on the existing gender patterns in a society. The aim of this thesis is to examine whether the implications for men and women in relation to trade liberalization can be found to differ. By stylizing some differences between men and women, this is done by examining the theoretical implications mainly via the Heckscher-Ohlin model and through a Beckerian approach. The implications found are then compared with the findings in existing empirical work. Illustrations contrasting the development of trade as a share of total GDP and the female relative wages in manufacturing in seven countries are also presented. These imply that over time both trade and female relative wages have increased in most cases. Based on the assumptions that women comprise mainly unskilled labour and own less capital than men, the predictions of the Heckscher-Ohlin model are that trade is expected to raise the relative wages for women in countries abundant in (unskilled) labour, while the opposite is expected in countries abundant in (skilled labour) capital. Becker implied that increased competition, here equalled to trade, is expected to eliminate producers’ economic capacity to indulge in their “taste for discrimination”. Earlier empirical studies confirm these relationships in some cases, while they in some cases contradict them. The findings of this study are thus inconclusive, and indicate the importance of continued research and deeper knowledge regarding the gender aspects of trade. (Less)
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@misc{1336402,
  abstract     = {In the light of ever increasing international trade around the globe, affecting men and women in all countries, it is surprising that so little attention is given its gender effects. The effects of trade are said to be gender neutral, but could potentially act reinforcing on the existing gender patterns in a society. The aim of this thesis is to examine whether the implications for men and women in relation to trade liberalization can be found to differ. By stylizing some differences between men and women, this is done by examining the theoretical implications mainly via the Heckscher-Ohlin model and through a Beckerian approach. The implications found are then compared with the findings in existing empirical work. Illustrations contrasting the development of trade as a share of total GDP and the female relative wages in manufacturing in seven countries are also presented. These imply that over time both trade and female relative wages have increased in most cases. Based on the assumptions that women comprise mainly unskilled labour and own less capital than men, the predictions of the Heckscher-Ohlin model are that trade is expected to raise the relative wages for women in countries abundant in (unskilled) labour, while the opposite is expected in countries abundant in (skilled labour) capital. Becker implied that increased competition, here equalled to trade, is expected to eliminate producers’ economic capacity to indulge in their “taste for discrimination”. Earlier empirical studies confirm these relationships in some cases, while they in some cases contradict them. The findings of this study are thus inconclusive, and indicate the importance of continued research and deeper knowledge regarding the gender aspects of trade.},
  author       = {Stoltz, Maria},
  keyword      = {Becker,discrimination,Trade liberalization,Gender wage gap,Heckscher-Ohlin,Economics, econometrics, economic theory, economic systems, economic policy,Nationalekonomi, ekonometri, ekonomisk teori, ekonomiska system, ekonomisk politik},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Effekter av ökad internationell handel på kvinnor kontra män},
  year         = {2008},
}