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Gender difference in facial imitation

Helland, Sara (2003)
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Facial expressions reveal emotion, and imitation of these expressions gives the imitator and understanding of how others feel. Are there gender differences in imitation of facial expressions? 61 male and female students participated in this study, where facial imitation was measured. The smiling (zygomatic) and frowning (corrugator) muscle was measured with EMG, as the participants viewed happy and angry faces. A significant result was found between gender, muscle and stimuli at the longest exposure time (2350 ms). This result showed that females responded with increased activity in the zygomatic muscle when viewing happy faces and more corrugator activity when viewing angry faces. The male participants on the other hand had more zygomatic... (More)
Facial expressions reveal emotion, and imitation of these expressions gives the imitator and understanding of how others feel. Are there gender differences in imitation of facial expressions? 61 male and female students participated in this study, where facial imitation was measured. The smiling (zygomatic) and frowning (corrugator) muscle was measured with EMG, as the participants viewed happy and angry faces. A significant result was found between gender, muscle and stimuli at the longest exposure time (2350 ms). This result showed that females responded with increased activity in the zygomatic muscle when viewing happy faces and more corrugator activity when viewing angry faces. The male participants on the other hand had more zygomatic activity (smiling) when viewing both happy and angry faces. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Helland, Sara
supervisor
organization
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Psychology, Psykologi
language
English
id
1356160
date added to LUP
2004-11-08 00:00:00
date last changed
2004-11-08 00:00:00
@misc{1356160,
  abstract     = {Facial expressions reveal emotion, and imitation of these expressions gives the imitator and understanding of how others feel. Are there gender differences in imitation of facial expressions? 61 male and female students participated in this study, where facial imitation was measured. The smiling (zygomatic) and frowning (corrugator) muscle was measured with EMG, as the participants viewed happy and angry faces. A significant result was found between gender, muscle and stimuli at the longest exposure time (2350 ms). This result showed that females responded with increased activity in the zygomatic muscle when viewing happy faces and more corrugator activity when viewing angry faces. The male participants on the other hand had more zygomatic activity (smiling) when viewing both happy and angry faces.},
  author       = {Helland, Sara},
  keyword      = {Psychology,Psykologi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Gender difference in facial imitation},
  year         = {2003},
}