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The Global Struggle over Genetic Resources

Gottschalk, Peter LU (2009) STVK01 20091
Department of Political Science
Abstract
ABS is the third objective of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the acronym for access to genetic resources and benefit-sharing, the legal-technical term designating the practice of collecting biological resources from nature. Rhetorically this practice is either designated as bio-prospecting or as biopiracy. The current regulation of ABS is found in Article 15 of the CBD. The implementation of Article 15 has however been slow and negotiations for an international ABS regime are underway. A detailed calendar of meetings – Nagoya Roadmap – has been adopted to move the negotiations forward. The deadline for the negotiations is set to 2010. I use a discourse theoretical framework to understand ABS policy-making and the creation... (More)
ABS is the third objective of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the acronym for access to genetic resources and benefit-sharing, the legal-technical term designating the practice of collecting biological resources from nature. Rhetorically this practice is either designated as bio-prospecting or as biopiracy. The current regulation of ABS is found in Article 15 of the CBD. The implementation of Article 15 has however been slow and negotiations for an international ABS regime are underway. A detailed calendar of meetings – Nagoya Roadmap – has been adopted to move the negotiations forward. The deadline for the negotiations is set to 2010. I use a discourse theoretical framework to understand ABS policy-making and the creation of an international ABS regime. I map a few meta-discourses of global environmental governance and examine them in relation to bio-prospecting and biopiracy discourses. In particular I examine how these discourses are mirrored in the operational policy discourse on disclosure requirements. While a discourse theoretical framework seems to provide a reasonable way to understand ABS policy-making, questions about the materiality of discourse are still unanswered. Moreover, the question of agency needs further theorizing. One conclusion is that further research is necessary in several respects. (Less)
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author
Gottschalk, Peter LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
(Mis)Understanding the Creation of an International Regime on Access to Genetic Resources and Benefit Sharing (ABS)
course
STVK01 20091
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
disclosure requirements, discourse analysis, Nagoya Roadmap, access to genetic resources and benefit-sharing (ABS), global environmental governance
language
English
id
1361803
date added to LUP
2009-04-17 09:04:09
date last changed
2009-04-17 09:04:09
@misc{1361803,
  abstract     = {ABS is the third objective of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the acronym for access to genetic resources and benefit-sharing, the legal-technical term designating the practice of collecting biological resources from nature. Rhetorically this practice is either designated as bio-prospecting or as biopiracy. The current regulation of ABS is found in Article 15 of the CBD. The implementation of Article 15 has however been slow and negotiations for an international ABS regime are underway. A detailed calendar of meetings – Nagoya Roadmap – has been adopted to move the negotiations forward. The deadline for the negotiations is set to 2010. I use a discourse theoretical framework to understand ABS policy-making and the creation of an international ABS regime. I map a few meta-discourses of global environmental governance and examine them in relation to bio-prospecting and biopiracy discourses. In particular I examine how these discourses are mirrored in the operational policy discourse on disclosure requirements. While a discourse theoretical framework seems to provide a reasonable way to understand ABS policy-making, questions about the materiality of discourse are still unanswered. Moreover, the question of agency needs further theorizing. One conclusion is that further research is necessary in several respects.},
  author       = {Gottschalk, Peter},
  keyword      = {disclosure requirements,discourse analysis,Nagoya Roadmap,access to genetic resources and benefit-sharing (ABS),global environmental governance},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Global Struggle over Genetic Resources},
  year         = {2009},
}