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How much does Origin Affect Earnings? Evidence on American Second Generation Immigrants

Pavlov, Hristiyan (2009)
Department of Economics
Abstract
This paper examines the parental background effect on male and female second generation immigrants’ annual earnings by comparing their annual income to that of workers with American descent on the US labor market. It uses data from the Current Population Surveys for the period 2000 - 2008 and utilizes the human capital earnings function into an OLS regression model to capture the income differentials. The effect of different parental composition is also analyzed to compare the impact on earnings of a domestically born parent. As an extension, the earnings gaps are studied at five different levels of schooling. Negative parental background effect is found on the annual earnings of male second generation immigrants with Mexican descent only,... (More)
This paper examines the parental background effect on male and female second generation immigrants’ annual earnings by comparing their annual income to that of workers with American descent on the US labor market. It uses data from the Current Population Surveys for the period 2000 - 2008 and utilizes the human capital earnings function into an OLS regression model to capture the income differentials. The effect of different parental composition is also analyzed to compare the impact on earnings of a domestically born parent. As an extension, the earnings gaps are studied at five different levels of schooling. Negative parental background effect is found on the annual earnings of male second generation immigrants with Mexican descent only, whereas the effect on all other categories of second generation immigrants is positive or close to zero. Furthermore, no solid proof of the advantage of having a domestic born parent could be reached. (Less)
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@misc{1436818,
  abstract     = {This paper examines the parental background effect on male and female second generation immigrants’ annual earnings by comparing their annual income to that of workers with American descent on the US labor market. It uses data from the Current Population Surveys for the period 2000 - 2008 and utilizes the human capital earnings function into an OLS regression model to capture the income differentials. The effect of different parental composition is also analyzed to compare the impact on earnings of a domestically born parent. As an extension, the earnings gaps are studied at five different levels of schooling. Negative parental background effect is found on the annual earnings of male second generation immigrants with Mexican descent only, whereas the effect on all other categories of second generation immigrants is positive or close to zero. Furthermore, no solid proof of the advantage of having a domestic born parent could be reached.},
  author       = {Pavlov, Hristiyan},
  keyword      = {second generation immigrants,parental background,annual earnings,human capital earnings function,OLS regression model,Economics, econometrics, economic theory, economic systems, economic policy,Nationalekonomi, ekonometri, ekonomisk teori, ekonomiska system, ekonomisk politik},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {How much does Origin Affect Earnings? Evidence on American Second Generation Immigrants},
  year         = {2009},
}