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In Search of Sexual Revolutions in New Delhi

Gabler, Mette LU (2009) MIDM70 20091
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
At the foundation of most inequalities in expression of sexuality lie the social constructions of gender. For this reason I consider sex and sexuality education as a possibility to challenge institutionalised sexism and enhance sexual well-being. As sex education has become a battle of morality, non-governmental organisations and others can be seen as alternatives to the national curriculum plan encouraged by the government. This thesis therefore discusses the potential of NGOs in terms of sexual empowerment by examining beliefs and understanding, choices of information, strategies and methods, and approaches apparent in sex education programs and projects.

Through qualitative data collection, semi-structured interviews (14) with NGO... (More)
At the foundation of most inequalities in expression of sexuality lie the social constructions of gender. For this reason I consider sex and sexuality education as a possibility to challenge institutionalised sexism and enhance sexual well-being. As sex education has become a battle of morality, non-governmental organisations and others can be seen as alternatives to the national curriculum plan encouraged by the government. This thesis therefore discusses the potential of NGOs in terms of sexual empowerment by examining beliefs and understanding, choices of information, strategies and methods, and approaches apparent in sex education programs and projects.

Through qualitative data collection, semi-structured interviews (14) with NGO staff and facilitators, two focus group discussions (FGD), five expert interviews supported by visits to event and workshops the findings were analysed by constructing a sexual empowerment model which divides components of sex education into four parts and utilises theories of empowerment (Freire and Sadan).

Main findings include that all four components of sex education; foundation, content, strategies and approaches show great potential to challenge gender typing. Sexual health programs and projects (SHPP) are seen to be highly participatory, deliberative and a way to encourage critical thinking. Some of the concerns that are highlighted are the strong focus on girls as the main actors of change and the external limitations e.g. parents, institutions and morality. I therefore, recommend gender sensitivity as an entry point for less threatening approaches and greater impact, and strengthening and reorganising collaboration. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Gabler, Mette LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Gendering Sex Education: Approaches for Sexual Empowerment
course
MIDM70 20091
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Sex education, gender, femininity, India, New Delhi, sexuality
language
English
id
1440117
date added to LUP
2009-08-14 13:27:43
date last changed
2010-05-07 13:14:26
@misc{1440117,
  abstract     = {At the foundation of most inequalities in expression of sexuality lie the social constructions of gender. For this reason I consider sex and sexuality education as a possibility to challenge institutionalised sexism and enhance sexual well-being. As sex education has become a battle of morality, non-governmental organisations and others can be seen as alternatives to the national curriculum plan encouraged by the government. This thesis therefore discusses the potential of NGOs in terms of sexual empowerment by examining beliefs and understanding, choices of information, strategies and methods, and approaches apparent in sex education programs and projects.

Through qualitative data collection, semi-structured interviews (14) with NGO staff and facilitators, two focus group discussions (FGD), five expert interviews supported by visits to event and workshops the findings were analysed by constructing a sexual empowerment model which divides components of sex education into four parts and utilises theories of empowerment (Freire and Sadan). 

Main findings include that all four components of sex education; foundation, content, strategies and approaches show great potential to challenge gender typing. Sexual health programs and projects (SHPP) are seen to be highly participatory, deliberative and a way to encourage critical thinking. Some of the concerns that are highlighted are the strong focus on girls as the main actors of change and the external limitations e.g. parents, institutions and morality. I therefore, recommend gender sensitivity as an entry point for less threatening approaches and greater impact, and strengthening and reorganising collaboration.},
  author       = {Gabler, Mette},
  keyword      = {Sex education,gender,femininity,India,New Delhi,sexuality},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {In Search of Sexual Revolutions in New Delhi},
  year         = {2009},
}