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Justice, to what end? Conflicting notions on the role of Justice in Reconciliation: The case of Rwanda

Ledel Karreskog, Johannes LU (2009) MRSK01 20091
Centre for Theology and Religious Studies
Human Rights Studies
Abstract
The thesis deals with how the ICTR and the Gacaca Courts of Rwanda contribute to reconciliation in wake of the genocide of 1994. They are compared on the basis that the two courts share similar mandates but are very different in structure and have received very different criticisms. The thesis employs discourse analysis through an analytical tool called logics of causality, and looks into the courts own understandings of their role in reconciliation and justice by looking at interviews conducted with people working in the Rwandan justice system as well as speeches by ICTR staff members. The analysis shows that while sharing some elements the different courts envision justice’s and a court’s role in reconciliation differently. Analysis also... (More)
The thesis deals with how the ICTR and the Gacaca Courts of Rwanda contribute to reconciliation in wake of the genocide of 1994. They are compared on the basis that the two courts share similar mandates but are very different in structure and have received very different criticisms. The thesis employs discourse analysis through an analytical tool called logics of causality, and looks into the courts own understandings of their role in reconciliation and justice by looking at interviews conducted with people working in the Rwandan justice system as well as speeches by ICTR staff members. The analysis shows that while sharing some elements the different courts envision justice’s and a court’s role in reconciliation differently. Analysis also showed that ICTR discourse focus on the international, a trait not shared by Rwandan courts, while not surprising it in part helps to understand problems of outreach of the ICTR. This is discussed in relation to Rwandan per-ceiving that the International Community is something different from them and as such the workings of the ICTR do not create a buzz among Rwandans. (Less)
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author
Ledel Karreskog, Johannes LU
supervisor
organization
course
MRSK01 20091
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Gacaca, ICTR, Rwanda, justice, reconciliation, discourse
language
English
id
1464423
date added to LUP
2009-09-02 13:10:54
date last changed
2014-09-04 08:27:49
@misc{1464423,
  abstract     = {The thesis deals with how the ICTR and the Gacaca Courts of Rwanda contribute to reconciliation in wake of the genocide of 1994. They are compared on the basis that the two courts share similar mandates but are very different in structure and have received very different criticisms. The thesis employs discourse analysis through an analytical tool called logics of causality, and looks into the courts own understandings of their role in reconciliation and justice by looking at interviews conducted with people working in the Rwandan justice system as well as speeches by ICTR staff members. The analysis shows that while sharing some elements the different courts envision justice’s and a court’s role in reconciliation differently. Analysis also showed that ICTR discourse focus on the international, a trait not shared by Rwandan courts, while not surprising it in part helps to understand problems of outreach of the ICTR. This is discussed in relation to Rwandan per-ceiving that the International Community is something different from them and as such the workings of the ICTR do not create a buzz among Rwandans.},
  author       = {Ledel Karreskog, Johannes},
  keyword      = {Gacaca,ICTR,Rwanda,justice,reconciliation,discourse},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Justice, to what end? Conflicting notions on the role of Justice in Reconciliation: The case of Rwanda},
  year         = {2009},
}