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Producing Human Rights Accountability - The Impact of Transnational Advocacy Networks in Uruguay

Ek, Lena LU (2009) STVK01 20092
Department of Political Science
Abstract
This papers examines the impact Transnational Advocacy Networks have had on the process for Human Rights Accountability in Uruguay. Uruguay has an amnesty law in place since 1986, but have in spite of this managed to prosecute main figures of the 1973-1985 dictatorship, and the amnesty law is currently seriously challenged. The 'Network thesis', regards these Transnational Advocacy Networks as key factors to change in accountability outcomes. In an article written by Cath Collins this is contested saying that the impact of these networks is constrained by domestic political and juridical limitations, and changes in these are the very core of change. I have tested her thesis, applying it on the Uruguayan case and agree, arguing that... (More)
This papers examines the impact Transnational Advocacy Networks have had on the process for Human Rights Accountability in Uruguay. Uruguay has an amnesty law in place since 1986, but have in spite of this managed to prosecute main figures of the 1973-1985 dictatorship, and the amnesty law is currently seriously challenged. The 'Network thesis', regards these Transnational Advocacy Networks as key factors to change in accountability outcomes. In an article written by Cath Collins this is contested saying that the impact of these networks is constrained by domestic political and juridical limitations, and changes in these are the very core of change. I have tested her thesis, applying it on the Uruguayan case and agree, arguing that domestic factors and actors have proved to be far more significant than the International Human Rights Network, without denying the importance it has. The field study was carried out through qualitative method research, interviewing prominent actors within the pro-accountability movement in Uruguay in May 2009. (Less)
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author
Ek, Lena LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK01 20092
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Post-Transitional Justice, Human Rights, Advocacy Networks, Uruguay, Accountability
language
English
id
1494538
date added to LUP
2009-11-23 09:36:13
date last changed
2009-11-23 09:36:13
@misc{1494538,
  abstract     = {This papers examines the impact Transnational Advocacy Networks have had on the process for Human Rights Accountability in Uruguay. Uruguay has an amnesty law in place since 1986, but have in spite of this managed to prosecute main figures of the 1973-1985 dictatorship, and the amnesty law is currently seriously challenged. The 'Network thesis', regards these Transnational Advocacy Networks as key factors to change in accountability outcomes. In an article written by Cath Collins this is contested saying that the impact of these networks is constrained by domestic political and juridical limitations, and changes in these are the very core of change. I have tested her thesis, applying it on the Uruguayan case and agree, arguing that domestic factors and actors have proved to be far more significant than the International Human Rights Network, without denying the importance it has. The field study was carried out through qualitative method research, interviewing prominent  actors within the pro-accountability movement in Uruguay in May 2009.},
  author       = {Ek, Lena},
  keyword      = {Post-Transitional Justice,Human Rights,Advocacy Networks,Uruguay,Accountability},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Producing Human Rights Accountability - The Impact of Transnational Advocacy Networks in Uruguay},
  year         = {2009},
}