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Piet - Fire Furniture

Hyltén-Cavallius, Fredrik (2009)
Industrial Design
Abstract
Abstract
This is a diploma work in industrial design by Fredrik Hyltén-Cavallius. In this project my goal was to find a product that could make the ancient fire fit better into our modern homes.
I started out by looking at fire related products such as stoves and barbecues on the Swedish market. Through several interviews I also looked more closely into a couple of heat related technologies such as stirling engines and peltier elements. The research phase also included the study of materials with good thermal properties such as airglass, cork and ceramics. This was also the phase were I learned more about ethanol as a fuel and the sustainability issues around it.
After the research I chose to work with a chimneyless stove with an... (More)
Abstract
This is a diploma work in industrial design by Fredrik Hyltén-Cavallius. In this project my goal was to find a product that could make the ancient fire fit better into our modern homes.
I started out by looking at fire related products such as stoves and barbecues on the Swedish market. Through several interviews I also looked more closely into a couple of heat related technologies such as stirling engines and peltier elements. The research phase also included the study of materials with good thermal properties such as airglass, cork and ceramics. This was also the phase were I learned more about ethanol as a fuel and the sustainability issues around it.
After the research I chose to work with a chimneyless stove with an ethanol burner. This was followed by a first ideation round. The concepts that came out of it were in hindsight too technical and didn’t focus on the right issues. I realized that the problem to be solved was not how fire could help the customer in a technical way like giving heat or cooking food. I also realized that the question was rather how fire could be presented in a way so that emotional qualities like Scandinavian cultural heritage and relaxation was enhanced.
I did another round of ideation after a second, more emotionally oriented, research phase. I found important inspiration in 18th century tiled stoves and in the brass reflectors of old candle holders.
5
In the concept refinement phase I made full scale print outs, real fire tests, full scale 3D paper models as well as interviews and study visits to learn more about materials, production methods and how fire and flames behave.
What I learned during the refinement was later applied to my chosen concept, a super ellipsoid ceramic stove with brass reflector and five wooden legs. I was ready to go into the prototype phase.
In the early stages of the prototype phase I had another setback. My first production partner for the ceramic part, toilet maker IFÖ, jumped the boat after several weeks of planning.
This, in combination with the wrong target focus in the first round of ideation, substantially prolonged the project and I felt forced to extend my time line to cover the summer.
However, I managed to find partners and sponsors for the two large parts I could not produce at the school workshops. The ceramic piece being manufactured with formidable stucco artist Hans Räthel in Lund and the brass reflector water jet-cut by extremely helpful Morgan Svensson at Pilum in Malmö.
In the end I had a functional prototype, with most parts made in real materials, of a chimneyless stove with an ethanol burner. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Hyltén-Cavallius, Fredrik
supervisor
organization
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
report number
ISRN: LUT-DVIDE/EX-09/50105--SE
other publication id
ISRN
language
English
id
1511065
date added to LUP
2009-11-26 13:49:15
date last changed
2009-11-26 13:49:15
@misc{1511065,
  abstract     = {Abstract
This is a diploma work in industrial design by Fredrik Hyltén-Cavallius. In this project my goal was to find a product that could make the ancient fire fit better into our modern homes.
I started out by looking at fire related products such as stoves and barbecues on the Swedish market. Through several interviews I also looked more closely into a couple of heat related technologies such as stirling engines and peltier elements. The research phase also included the study of materials with good thermal properties such as airglass, cork and ceramics. This was also the phase were I learned more about ethanol as a fuel and the sustainability issues around it. 
After the research I chose to work with a chimneyless stove with an ethanol burner. This was followed by a first ideation round. The concepts that came out of it were in hindsight too technical and didn’t focus on the right issues. I realized that the problem to be solved was not how fire could help the customer in a technical way like giving heat or cooking food. I also realized that the question was rather how fire could be presented in a way so that emotional qualities like Scandinavian cultural heritage and relaxation was enhanced. 
I did another round of ideation after a second, more emotionally oriented, research phase. I found important inspiration in 18th century tiled stoves and in the brass reflectors of old candle holders.
5
In the concept refinement phase I made full scale print outs, real fire tests, full scale 3D paper models as well as interviews and study visits to learn more about materials, production methods and how fire and flames behave.
What I learned during the refinement was later applied to my chosen concept, a super ellipsoid ceramic stove with brass reflector and five wooden legs. I was ready to go into the prototype phase.
In the early stages of the prototype phase I had another setback. My first production partner for the ceramic part, toilet maker IFÖ, jumped the boat after several weeks of planning. 
This, in combination with the wrong target focus in the first round of ideation, substantially prolonged the project and I felt forced to extend my time line to cover the summer.
However, I managed to find partners and sponsors for the two large parts I could not produce at the school workshops. The ceramic piece being manufactured with formidable stucco artist Hans Räthel in Lund and the brass reflector water jet-cut by extremely helpful Morgan Svensson at Pilum in Malmö.
In the end I had a functional prototype, with most parts made in real materials, of a chimneyless stove with an ethanol burner.},
  author       = {Hyltén-Cavallius, Fredrik},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Piet - Fire Furniture},
  year         = {2009},
}