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Digital Remains and End of Life Traditions

Nordin, Kristofer; Bosevski, Dragan and Hall, Anders (2009)
Department of Informatics
Abstract
In this article we present a concept for a ubiquitous service that allows memories to be saved and stored during an individual's lifetime and later, after death, for those digital remains to be published and experienced at the specific geographic location where they were created. Through this concept we explore ways to combine modern technology with century old habits at the end of life. We ask: "How do users value digital remains and how could it be used in accordance with user requirements?" This study suggests that awareness of digital remains is very low, and few people have considered what to do with their digital remains or come in contact with other person‟s. People are interested both in experiencing and leaving digital remains for... (More)
In this article we present a concept for a ubiquitous service that allows memories to be saved and stored during an individual's lifetime and later, after death, for those digital remains to be published and experienced at the specific geographic location where they were created. Through this concept we explore ways to combine modern technology with century old habits at the end of life. We ask: "How do users value digital remains and how could it be used in accordance with user requirements?" This study suggests that awareness of digital remains is very low, and few people have considered what to do with their digital remains or come in contact with other person‟s. People are interested both in experiencing and leaving digital remains for others to experience though few get the chance to do neither. The best caretakers of digital remains are friends, family and close relatives. Digital remains are seen as valuable source of affective and historical information. Present end of life technology are mostly augmentations of old traditions, not new phenomenons. The novel approach, as presented in the concept, lies in the fact that it will become possible to store, preserve and especially experience digital remains, from common and famous alike, in much greater depth and scale than ever before. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
@misc{1516524,
  abstract     = {In this article we present a concept for a ubiquitous service that allows memories to be saved and stored during an individual's lifetime and later, after death, for those digital remains to be published and experienced at the specific geographic location where they were created. Through this concept we explore ways to combine modern technology with century old habits at the end of life. We ask: "How do users value digital remains and how could it be used in accordance with user requirements?" This study suggests that awareness of digital remains is very low, and few people have considered what to do with their digital remains or come in contact with other person‟s. People are interested both in experiencing and leaving digital remains for others to experience though few get the chance to do neither. The best caretakers of digital remains are friends, family and close relatives. Digital remains are seen as valuable source of affective and historical information. Present end of life technology are mostly augmentations of old traditions, not new phenomenons. The novel approach, as presented in the concept, lies in the fact that it will become possible to store, preserve and especially experience digital remains, from common and famous alike, in much greater depth and scale than ever before.},
  author       = {Nordin, Kristofer and Bosevski, Dragan and Hall, Anders},
  keyword      = {Interaction design,user-centered design,social computing,ubiquitous computing,location-aware computing,mobile interaction,end-of-life technology,death and dying,mourning,bereavement,grief,contemporary autobiography,documentation of self,digital remains,Informatics, systems theory,Informatik, systemteori},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Digital Remains and End of Life Traditions},
  year         = {2009},
}