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Konstitutioner - tandlösa verktyg? : en studie av två konstitutioners roll för ursprungsbefolkningens rättigheter i Bolivia

Sjöblom, Sanna LU (2010) MRSG20 20092
Human Rights Studies
Centre for Theology and Religious Studies
Abstract
During the last decade, a new trend has emerged among several Latin American countries in changing their constitutions. The reforms have by many been welcomed, especially among the indigenous peoples who have, since the colonization of the continent, been marginalised compared to the rest of the population. Bolivia is the country who most recently changed its constitution, now with a big focus on the indigenous part of the population. The design of a constitution has shown to be crucial for the identity for the people, and can contribute to unite or divide a state. This is particularly true when it comes to divided societies, where a constitution carries out an extra heavy burden. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the results of... (More)
During the last decade, a new trend has emerged among several Latin American countries in changing their constitutions. The reforms have by many been welcomed, especially among the indigenous peoples who have, since the colonization of the continent, been marginalised compared to the rest of the population. Bolivia is the country who most recently changed its constitution, now with a big focus on the indigenous part of the population. The design of a constitution has shown to be crucial for the identity for the people, and can contribute to unite or divide a state. This is particularly true when it comes to divided societies, where a constitution carries out an extra heavy burden. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the results of the constitutional reforms on the indigenous peoples of Bolivia and how the identity of the Bolivian people has been affected. Bolivia qualifies as a divided society, making it possible to apply a theory of these kinds of societies to the thesis. (Less)
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author
Sjöblom, Sanna LU
supervisor
organization
course
MRSG20 20092
year
type
L2 - 2nd term paper (old degree order)
subject
keywords
Bolivia, constitutions, indigenous peoples, divided society, identity, ursprungsbefolkningar
language
Swedish
id
1524918
date added to LUP
2010-03-04 16:57:23
date last changed
2014-09-04 08:27:47
@misc{1524918,
  abstract     = {During the last decade, a new trend has emerged among several Latin American countries in changing their constitutions. The reforms have by many been welcomed, especially among the indigenous peoples who have, since the colonization of the continent, been marginalised compared to the rest of the population. Bolivia is the country who most recently changed its constitution, now with a big focus on the indigenous part of the population. The design of a constitution has shown to be crucial for the identity for the people, and can contribute to unite or divide a state. This is particularly true when it comes to divided societies, where a constitution carries out an extra heavy burden. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the results of the constitutional reforms on the indigenous peoples of Bolivia and how the identity of the Bolivian people has been affected. Bolivia qualifies as a divided society, making it possible to apply a theory of these kinds of societies to the thesis.},
  author       = {Sjöblom, Sanna},
  keyword      = {Bolivia,constitutions,indigenous peoples,divided society,identity,ursprungsbefolkningar},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Konstitutioner - tandlösa verktyg? : en studie av två konstitutioners roll för ursprungsbefolkningens rättigheter i Bolivia},
  year         = {2010},
}