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Sekuritisering av migration - Mexikansk invandring som ett amerikanskt säkerhetshot efter 11:e september-dåden

Johansson, Caroline LU (2009) STVK01 20092
Department of Political Science
Abstract
This thesis is a case study, which sets out to argue that the U.S., through the discourse of security, has been able to use measures to control migration that would otherwise not have been legitimized. The new agenda of migration as a security threat makes it possible to frame a necessity of increased regulations around the boarder. The effects of 9/11 on US policy with regards to Mexican immigration are investigated.
The paper is based on the theory of securitisation, which focuses on the role played by important political actors in shaping a discourse around migration. This discourse is then seen as legitimizing for the actions taken in controlling migration, which might otherwise go against the standards of human rights that are... (More)
This thesis is a case study, which sets out to argue that the U.S., through the discourse of security, has been able to use measures to control migration that would otherwise not have been legitimized. The new agenda of migration as a security threat makes it possible to frame a necessity of increased regulations around the boarder. The effects of 9/11 on US policy with regards to Mexican immigration are investigated.
The paper is based on the theory of securitisation, which focuses on the role played by important political actors in shaping a discourse around migration. This discourse is then seen as legitimizing for the actions taken in controlling migration, which might otherwise go against the standards of human rights that are normally the focus of liberal democracies.
In the case of Mexican migration to the USA, it is clear that there has been an actual discourse of securitization due to the 9/11-events. This would indicate that the Mexican boarder has been framed as a threat to the American national security even though they do not pose any proofed connection to terrorism. (Less)
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author
Johansson, Caroline LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK01 20092
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
9/11 attacks, migration, securitisation, U.S., Mexiko
language
Swedish
id
1526171
date added to LUP
2010-02-01 11:40:02
date last changed
2010-02-01 11:40:02
@misc{1526171,
  abstract     = {This thesis is a case study, which sets out to argue that the U.S., through the discourse of security, has been able to use measures to control migration that would otherwise not have been legitimized. The new agenda of migration as a security threat makes it possible to frame a necessity of increased regulations around the boarder. The effects of 9/11 on US policy with regards to Mexican immigration are investigated.
The paper is based on the theory of securitisation, which focuses on the role played by important political actors in shaping a discourse around migration. This discourse is then seen as legitimizing for the actions taken in controlling migration, which might otherwise go against the standards of human rights that are normally the focus of liberal democracies. 
In the case of Mexican migration to the USA, it is clear that there has been an actual discourse of securitization due to the 9/11-events. This would indicate that the Mexican boarder has been framed as a threat to the American national security even though they do not pose any proofed connection to terrorism.},
  author       = {Johansson, Caroline},
  keyword      = {9/11 attacks,migration,securitisation,U.S.,Mexiko},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Sekuritisering av migration - Mexikansk invandring som ett amerikanskt säkerhetshot efter 11:e september-dåden},
  year         = {2009},
}