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Terrorism: Defining the Concept of Terrorism and Examining Legislative and Coercive Counter-Terrorism Responses

Hästesko, Catarina (2003)
Department of Law
Abstract
Terrorism is a widely discussed phenomenon, but still it remains an undefined term in international law. In media and every day language the term seems to include almost any kind of violence. This uncertainty surrounding the definition has led to a situation where the word terrorism is open to any interpretation. As a result terrorism is often viewed as 'violence of which we do not approve'. There are numerous problems related to the definition of terrorism. Some of these are illuminated and discussed in this thesis. Following on these discussions, a definition is formulated and its pros and cons described. Terrorism is a frightening phenomenon. It is not only a threat to the individual but also a threat to our societies and the world... (More)
Terrorism is a widely discussed phenomenon, but still it remains an undefined term in international law. In media and every day language the term seems to include almost any kind of violence. This uncertainty surrounding the definition has led to a situation where the word terrorism is open to any interpretation. As a result terrorism is often viewed as 'violence of which we do not approve'. There are numerous problems related to the definition of terrorism. Some of these are illuminated and discussed in this thesis. Following on these discussions, a definition is formulated and its pros and cons described. Terrorism is a frightening phenomenon. It is not only a threat to the individual but also a threat to our societies and the world order. As many powerful states engage themselves in a war against terrorists we sense a loss of freedom and safety of our integrity. There is an increase of destabilisation in the world and heightened tension between states. Counter-measures to terrorism can be of various kinds. This thesis examines legal instruments used at international, regional and national levels to regulate, prevent and control the phenomenon. When submitted to an attack, states are often provoked to use violence in their response against terrorism. The states' right to use force in response to terrorism, and the United States' military actions in Afghanistan in the aftermath of September 11th in particular, are discussed in this thesis. Furthermore, on a few lines I will discuss future legal responses to terrorism by the international community. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Hästesko, Catarina
supervisor
organization
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Folkrätt
language
English
id
1558487
date added to LUP
2010-03-08 15:55:22
date last changed
2010-03-08 15:55:22
@misc{1558487,
  abstract     = {Terrorism is a widely discussed phenomenon, but still it remains an undefined term in international law. In media and every day language the term seems to include almost any kind of violence. This uncertainty surrounding the definition has led to a situation where the word terrorism is open to any interpretation. As a result terrorism is often viewed as 'violence of which we do not approve'. There are numerous problems related to the definition of terrorism. Some of these are illuminated and discussed in this thesis. Following on these discussions, a definition is formulated and its pros and cons described. Terrorism is a frightening phenomenon. It is not only a threat to the individual but also a threat to our societies and the world order. As many powerful states engage themselves in a war against terrorists we sense a loss of freedom and safety of our integrity. There is an increase of destabilisation in the world and heightened tension between states. Counter-measures to terrorism can be of various kinds. This thesis examines legal instruments used at international, regional and national levels to regulate, prevent and control the phenomenon. When submitted to an attack, states are often provoked to use violence in their response against terrorism. The states' right to use force in response to terrorism, and the United States' military actions in Afghanistan in the aftermath of September 11th in particular, are discussed in this thesis. Furthermore, on a few lines I will discuss future legal responses to terrorism by the international community.},
  author       = {Hästesko, Catarina},
  keyword      = {Folkrätt},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Terrorism: Defining the Concept of Terrorism and Examining Legislative and Coercive Counter-Terrorism Responses},
  year         = {2003},
}