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Äktenskap mellan par av samma kön - Nästa steg i acceptansen av homosexuella i det svenska samhället

Lund Spångberg, Johanna (2008)
Department of Law
Abstract
Infatuation and love are two words associated with marriage, but from a historical perspective marriage has nothing to do with love. Marriage has been regulated by both religious and secular rules since medieval times. At first marriage was most common in wealthy families but with the involvement of the church marriage became a sacrament and something every good Christian had to commit to unless they wanted to live in sin. Throughout history marriage has been an agreement between two families with the purpose to pass on their legacy to the next generation. During the 18th and 19th century marriage was not merely a private arrangement between two families but also a social and religious framework to conform to. The religious wedding... (More)
Infatuation and love are two words associated with marriage, but from a historical perspective marriage has nothing to do with love. Marriage has been regulated by both religious and secular rules since medieval times. At first marriage was most common in wealthy families but with the involvement of the church marriage became a sacrament and something every good Christian had to commit to unless they wanted to live in sin. Throughout history marriage has been an agreement between two families with the purpose to pass on their legacy to the next generation. During the 18th and 19th century marriage was not merely a private arrangement between two families but also a social and religious framework to conform to. The religious wedding ceremony was the primary form of marriage up until 1915 when the option to enter into a civil union was introduced. Marriage evolved further through the ''new'' marriage law, witch was based on the idea of a more equal marriage. Today marriage is a civil contract between a woman and a man. For the gay community it has been a different story. Homosexual relations weren't decriminalized in Sweden until 1944, but homosexuality was considered a mental disorder until 1979. In spite of the decriminalization the government instated various age limitations on homosexual relations. The repercussions for not complying were harsh. In 1978 the age limitations were equalized in order to be the same for both hetero- and homosexuals. The same year an investigation was also launched to asses the situation faced by homosexuals in Swedish society. It was finished in 1984. The investigation paved the way for the decision to ban discrimination and the introduction of a law for homosexuals living together in 1987. In 1987 another law was also instated, called ''bastuklubbslagen''. By closing all public meeting places where people went to have sex the law was meant to prevent aids from spreading. In 1995 homosexuals were given the option to register their partnership. A registered partnership is more or less the same as a marriage but without the same symbolic value. The next step is perhaps same-sex marriages, an idea suggested in the report SOU 2007:17. Only marriage in the legal sense of the word is considered in the report. The arguments in favor for and against same-sex marriages are many and the subject is sensitive because the church still considers marriage to be a sacrament ordained by God for man and woman. But the question of same-sex marriages has not only been raised in Sweden. In the Netherlands, as well as in some other countries, same-sex marriages are already practiced and in Norway a report is completed. On Ireland they are considering to instate registered partnerships sometime during next year. So, the question is whether same-sex marriages are the next step in accepting homosexuality in Swedish society. (Less)
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author
Lund Spångberg, Johanna
supervisor
organization
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Familjerätt
language
Swedish
id
1559822
date added to LUP
2010-03-08 15:55:24
date last changed
2010-03-08 15:55:24
@misc{1559822,
  abstract     = {Infatuation and love are two words associated with marriage, but from a historical perspective marriage has nothing to do with love. Marriage has been regulated by both religious and secular rules since medieval times. At first marriage was most common in wealthy families but with the involvement of the church marriage became a sacrament and something every good Christian had to commit to unless they wanted to live in sin. Throughout history marriage has been an agreement between two families with the purpose to pass on their legacy to the next generation. During the 18th and 19th century marriage was not merely a private arrangement between two families but also a social and religious framework to conform to. The religious wedding ceremony was the primary form of marriage up until 1915 when the option to enter into a civil union was introduced. Marriage evolved further through the ''new'' marriage law, witch was based on the idea of a more equal marriage. Today marriage is a civil contract between a woman and a man. For the gay community it has been a different story. Homosexual relations weren't decriminalized in Sweden until 1944, but homosexuality was considered a mental disorder until 1979. In spite of the decriminalization the government instated various age limitations on homosexual relations. The repercussions for not complying were harsh. In 1978 the age limitations were equalized in order to be the same for both hetero- and homosexuals. The same year an investigation was also launched to asses the situation faced by homosexuals in Swedish society. It was finished in 1984. The investigation paved the way for the decision to ban discrimination and the introduction of a law for homosexuals living together in 1987. In 1987 another law was also instated, called ''bastuklubbslagen''. By closing all public meeting places where people went to have sex the law was meant to prevent aids from spreading. In 1995 homosexuals were given the option to register their partnership. A registered partnership is more or less the same as a marriage but without the same symbolic value. The next step is perhaps same-sex marriages, an idea suggested in the report SOU 2007:17. Only marriage in the legal sense of the word is considered in the report. The arguments in favor for and against same-sex marriages are many and the subject is sensitive because the church still considers marriage to be a sacrament ordained by God for man and woman. But the question of same-sex marriages has not only been raised in Sweden. In the Netherlands, as well as in some other countries, same-sex marriages are already practiced and in Norway a report is completed. On Ireland they are considering to instate registered partnerships sometime during next year. So, the question is whether same-sex marriages are the next step in accepting homosexuality in Swedish society.},
  author       = {Lund Spångberg, Johanna},
  keyword      = {Familjerätt},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Äktenskap mellan par av samma kön - Nästa steg i acceptansen av homosexuella i det svenska samhället},
  year         = {2008},
}