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The human rights of trafficked women An Essay with the focus on Sweden

Nilsson, Anna (2001)
Department of Law
Abstract
This is a thesis analysing the human rights of women who are trafficked to Sweden for the purpose of sexual exploitation. Sexual slavery is a highly lucrative global industry controlled by powerful criminal organisations. These groups make an estimated $7 billion a year on trafficking. Young women are often lured into prostitution rings by advertisements for domestic positions abroad and find themselves bought and sold via catalogues or by close family members. Once in the country of destination they are enslaved, beaten and raped, before being traded from one master or brothel owner to the next, frequently working up to 18 hours a day. They are at the mercy of the brothel owner, finding themselves in many cases illegally without a... (More)
This is a thesis analysing the human rights of women who are trafficked to Sweden for the purpose of sexual exploitation. Sexual slavery is a highly lucrative global industry controlled by powerful criminal organisations. These groups make an estimated $7 billion a year on trafficking. Young women are often lured into prostitution rings by advertisements for domestic positions abroad and find themselves bought and sold via catalogues or by close family members. Once in the country of destination they are enslaved, beaten and raped, before being traded from one master or brothel owner to the next, frequently working up to 18 hours a day. They are at the mercy of the brothel owner, finding themselves in many cases illegally without a passport in a foreign country. Trafficking is a rather new phenomenon in Sweden that has not been analysed from a human rights perspective. Sweden has a criminal law approach to the problem and looks upon the women as illegal immigrants who are deported as soon as evidence of the crime is secured. The first three chapter are mainly dedicated to presenting the factual situation of women trafficked to Sweden. I considered that necessary in order understand the following analyse of international human rights law. Chapter 5 and 6 are analytical. In chapter 5 I present and analyse relevant human rights instruments, the ECHR, the ICCPR, the CEDAW and the Convention relating to the status of refugees. The conclusions reached in chapter 5 on what rights trafficked women have under international law are compared with Swedish law and practice in chapter 6. My conclusions are that the trafficked women must be protected and provided with an effective remedy against their perpetrators. Some of them might be refugees entitled to asylum. They can further not be deported without considering the situation the women face upon return. Automatic deportation violates the prohibition of non-refoulement. My thesis is in some parts innovative and my conclusions differ from state practise regarding certain areas. For this reason I clearly state what conclusions are my own and what conclusions are confirmed by authoritative sources. I give my recommendations on necessary and desirable changes in Swedish law and practise in the last chapter. (Less)
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author
Nilsson, Anna
supervisor
organization
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Folkrätt
language
English
id
1560460
date added to LUP
2010-03-08 15:55:26
date last changed
2010-03-08 15:55:26
@misc{1560460,
  abstract     = {This is a thesis analysing the human rights of women who are trafficked to Sweden for the purpose of sexual exploitation. Sexual slavery is a highly lucrative global industry controlled by powerful criminal organisations. These groups make an estimated $7 billion a year on trafficking. Young women are often lured into prostitution rings by advertisements for domestic positions abroad and find themselves bought and sold via catalogues or by close family members. Once in the country of destination they are enslaved, beaten and raped, before being traded from one master or brothel owner to the next, frequently working up to 18 hours a day. They are at the mercy of the brothel owner, finding themselves in many cases illegally without a passport in a foreign country. Trafficking is a rather new phenomenon in Sweden that has not been analysed from a human rights perspective. Sweden has a criminal law approach to the problem and looks upon the women as illegal immigrants who are deported as soon as evidence of the crime is secured. The first three chapter are mainly dedicated to presenting the factual situation of women trafficked to Sweden. I considered that necessary in order understand the following analyse of international human rights law. Chapter 5 and 6 are analytical. In chapter 5 I present and analyse relevant human rights instruments, the ECHR, the ICCPR, the CEDAW and the Convention relating to the status of refugees. The conclusions reached in chapter 5 on what rights trafficked women have under international law are compared with Swedish law and practice in chapter 6. My conclusions are that the trafficked women must be protected and provided with an effective remedy against their perpetrators. Some of them might be refugees entitled to asylum. They can further not be deported without considering the situation the women face upon return. Automatic deportation violates the prohibition of non-refoulement. My thesis is in some parts innovative and my conclusions differ from state practise regarding certain areas. For this reason I clearly state what conclusions are my own and what conclusions are confirmed by authoritative sources. I give my recommendations on necessary and desirable changes in Swedish law and practise in the last chapter.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Anna},
  keyword      = {Folkrätt},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The human rights of trafficked women An Essay with the focus on Sweden},
  year         = {2001},
}