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War Crimes in International Criminal Law

Nilsson, Jonas (1999)
Department of Law
Abstract
About 50 years ago the United Nations' Declaration on Human Rights was developed in order to set down the ground rules for human behaviour. Despite this, and other efforts in the same direction, the post war period has produced an estimated 170 million casualties during armed conflicts and tyrannical regimes and this along with numerous other harmful consequences. Extensive declarations as well as well-developed conventions and treaties have too many times proven insufficient and so have many of the different methods chosen to enforce them. International criminal law, with Draft Codes, ad hoc-tribunals and an international criminal court, is now probably the method with the highest credibility, and maybe not unfounded so. At the same time... (More)
About 50 years ago the United Nations' Declaration on Human Rights was developed in order to set down the ground rules for human behaviour. Despite this, and other efforts in the same direction, the post war period has produced an estimated 170 million casualties during armed conflicts and tyrannical regimes and this along with numerous other harmful consequences. Extensive declarations as well as well-developed conventions and treaties have too many times proven insufficient and so have many of the different methods chosen to enforce them. International criminal law, with Draft Codes, ad hoc-tribunals and an international criminal court, is now probably the method with the highest credibility, and maybe not unfounded so. At the same time it is, in many aspects, poorly underdeveloped. My personal interest in the field international criminal law has been developed through courses and seminars in Antwerp, Lund and Arusha but also through following the process of establishing the International Criminal Court. I would like to thank my supervisor Professor Göran Melander at the Raoul Wallenberg Institute in Lund. Furthermore I would like to thank Lars Olsson and Lucia Catani for advice, comments and critique. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Nilsson, Jonas
supervisor
organization
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Folkrätt
language
English
id
1560559
date added to LUP
2010-03-08 15:55:26
date last changed
2010-03-08 15:55:26
@misc{1560559,
  abstract     = {About 50 years ago the United Nations' Declaration on Human Rights was developed in order to set down the ground rules for human behaviour. Despite this, and other efforts in the same direction, the post war period has produced an estimated 170 million casualties during armed conflicts and tyrannical regimes and this along with numerous other harmful consequences. Extensive declarations as well as well-developed conventions and treaties have too many times proven insufficient and so have many of the different methods chosen to enforce them. International criminal law, with Draft Codes, ad hoc-tribunals and an international criminal court, is now probably the method with the highest credibility, and maybe not unfounded so. At the same time it is, in many aspects, poorly underdeveloped. My personal interest in the field international criminal law has been developed through courses and seminars in Antwerp, Lund and Arusha but also through following the process of establishing the International Criminal Court. I would like to thank my supervisor Professor Göran Melander at the Raoul Wallenberg Institute in Lund. Furthermore I would like to thank Lars Olsson and Lucia Catani for advice, comments and critique.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Jonas},
  keyword      = {Folkrätt},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {War Crimes in International Criminal Law},
  year         = {1999},
}