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Equality and Development

Stjernrup, Kristin (2007)
Department of Law
Abstract
The connection between human rights and development co-operation in the context of the European Union, which are the matters concerned in this paper, has proven to be both a contentious and complex subject. Human rights and development co-operation are two areas of practice and law, which in the past of the EU has not had an explicit relationship. Over the passed decade or so, the connection between the two has however, been more and more acknowledged at an international level. Especially the connection between human rights and trade as incorporated in development co-operation has drawn interest. More and more are realizing that human rights in fact are business and that human rights, trade and development are connected in a way that to... (More)
The connection between human rights and development co-operation in the context of the European Union, which are the matters concerned in this paper, has proven to be both a contentious and complex subject. Human rights and development co-operation are two areas of practice and law, which in the past of the EU has not had an explicit relationship. Over the passed decade or so, the connection between the two has however, been more and more acknowledged at an international level. Especially the connection between human rights and trade as incorporated in development co-operation has drawn interest. More and more are realizing that human rights in fact are business and that human rights, trade and development are connected in a way that to some extent make them inseparably. The aim of this thesis is to present a closer look at the relationship between human rights, in particular gender equality and development co-operation in the context of the EU. Gender equality plays a significant roll in the policy framework of the EU and the EU has committed itself to strive towards gender equality in all areas of the Union. The purpose of this paper therefore is to further examine the extent of the equality approach taken by the EU in the area of development co-operation and to some extent also trade. The purpose is furthermore to show that even if the EU has the attention to strive towards gender equality, the measures taken are inconsistent as well as inadequate. All EU trade and development co-operation agreements should in my opinion and which I also argue for in this paper, contribute to the promotion of social and gender equality because inequalities may be unintentionally reinforced if trade policies and agreements remain silent on gender equality. Most importantly however, is that legislative proposals are made as well as concrete measures are taken in the area of law to create gender equality in reality. There are, and always have been, sharp differences between the views and the concerns of member states in the international society, related in part to the values embodied in their own political systems and their own different economic and social situations and histories. Today the large economic differences between rich, poor and transition countries is also reflected and an important part of the different views of countries. The special protection afforded to women under CEDAW for example seems to attract little respect when there is a need for low paid workers engaged in the production of export goods. It is therefore important that EU in its development co-operation make an effort to put forward the right of women as a condition for development co-operation and for trade. (Less)
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author
Stjernrup, Kristin
supervisor
organization
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
EG-rätt
language
English
id
1562149
date added to LUP
2010-03-08 15:55:29
date last changed
2010-03-08 15:55:29
@misc{1562149,
  abstract     = {The connection between human rights and development co-operation in the context of the European Union, which are the matters concerned in this paper, has proven to be both a contentious and complex subject. Human rights and development co-operation are two areas of practice and law, which in the past of the EU has not had an explicit relationship. Over the passed decade or so, the connection between the two has however, been more and more acknowledged at an international level. Especially the connection between human rights and trade as incorporated in development co-operation has drawn interest. More and more are realizing that human rights in fact are business and that human rights, trade and development are connected in a way that to some extent make them inseparably. The aim of this thesis is to present a closer look at the relationship between human rights, in particular gender equality and development co-operation in the context of the EU. Gender equality plays a significant roll in the policy framework of the EU and the EU has committed itself to strive towards gender equality in all areas of the Union. The purpose of this paper therefore is to further examine the extent of the equality approach taken by the EU in the area of development co-operation and to some extent also trade. The purpose is furthermore to show that even if the EU has the attention to strive towards gender equality, the measures taken are inconsistent as well as inadequate. All EU trade and development co-operation agreements should in my opinion and which I also argue for in this paper, contribute to the promotion of social and gender equality because inequalities may be unintentionally reinforced if trade policies and agreements remain silent on gender equality. Most importantly however, is that legislative proposals are made as well as concrete measures are taken in the area of law to create gender equality in reality. There are, and always have been, sharp differences between the views and the concerns of member states in the international society, related in part to the values embodied in their own political systems and their own different economic and social situations and histories. Today the large economic differences between rich, poor and transition countries is also reflected and an important part of the different views of countries. The special protection afforded to women under CEDAW for example seems to attract little respect when there is a need for low paid workers engaged in the production of export goods. It is therefore important that EU in its development co-operation make an effort to put forward the right of women as a condition for development co-operation and for trade.},
  author       = {Stjernrup, Kristin},
  keyword      = {EG-rätt},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Equality and Development},
  year         = {2007},
}