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The Treaty and the Union: An Assessment of Democratic Theories in a Post Lisbon EU

Rosenquist, Åsa Rebecca LU (2010) STVM18 20101
Department of Political Science
Abstract
This paper assesses the democratic value brought to the European Union through the effect of the Lisbon Treaty. In doing so, it especially looks at how tendencies and theories presented in this Treaty can address criticism of a lacking EU democracy. The paper first details the so
called democratic deficit debate, highlighting the five pillars in which the EU is often considered inadequate. Drawing from this debate, the paper goes on to concentrate on different theories of democracy, in order to assess which one can be deemed the best fit for a sui- generis body such as the EU ; and also in order to see how such different theories alters the critiques facing the EU. Finally, several Articles from the Treaty itself, focusing on democratic... (More)
This paper assesses the democratic value brought to the European Union through the effect of the Lisbon Treaty. In doing so, it especially looks at how tendencies and theories presented in this Treaty can address criticism of a lacking EU democracy. The paper first details the so
called democratic deficit debate, highlighting the five pillars in which the EU is often considered inadequate. Drawing from this debate, the paper goes on to concentrate on different theories of democracy, in order to assess which one can be deemed the best fit for a sui- generis body such as the EU ; and also in order to see how such different theories alters the critiques facing the EU. Finally, several Articles from the Treaty itself, focusing on democratic values and the operation of the Union, are assessed using a content analysis and a discourse analysis. The purpose of this is to assess whether a particular democratic theory
appears to be favoured in the Treaty. The results from this analysis indicate that the Lisbon Treaty is heavily focused on democratic credentials, and can such be deemed as an EU response to critiques of undemocratic conduct. Furthermore, it favours a democratic theory
built on a representative and deliberative model. The final arguments look at whether such a focus can adequately address the democratic dilemma the Union is facing, and how this might happen in practice. The main arguments are illustrated with reference to theories of democracy as well as the content of the Lisbon Treaty. (Less)
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author
Rosenquist, Åsa Rebecca LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVM18 20101
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
democratic theory, European Union, Lisbon Treaty
language
English
id
1608175
date added to LUP
2010-06-29 15:31:42
date last changed
2010-06-29 15:31:42
@misc{1608175,
  abstract     = {This paper assesses the democratic value brought to the European Union through the effect of the Lisbon Treaty. In doing so, it especially looks at how tendencies and theories presented in this Treaty can address criticism of a lacking EU democracy. The paper first details the so
called democratic deficit debate, highlighting the five pillars in which the EU is often considered inadequate. Drawing from this debate, the paper goes on to concentrate on different theories of democracy, in order to assess which one can be deemed the best fit for a sui- generis body such as the EU ; and also in order to see how such different theories alters the critiques facing the EU. Finally, several Articles from the Treaty itself, focusing on democratic values and the operation of the Union, are assessed using a content analysis and a discourse analysis. The purpose of this is to assess whether a particular democratic theory
appears to be favoured in the Treaty. The results from this analysis indicate that the Lisbon Treaty is heavily focused on democratic credentials, and can such be deemed as an EU response to critiques of undemocratic conduct. Furthermore, it favours a democratic theory
built on a representative and deliberative model. The final arguments look at whether such a focus can adequately address the democratic dilemma the Union is facing, and how this might happen in practice. The main arguments are illustrated with reference to theories of democracy as well as the content of the Lisbon Treaty.},
  author       = {Rosenquist, Åsa Rebecca},
  keyword      = {democratic theory,European Union,Lisbon Treaty},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Treaty and the Union: An Assessment of Democratic Theories in a Post Lisbon EU},
  year         = {2010},
}