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Den Hållbara Villan - Design och Energistudie av ett Passivhus

Martell, Olof and Pålsson, Oscar (2010)
Civil Engineering - Architecture (BSc)
Abstract
The term "Passive house" refers to a voluntary standard that many new buildings meet. The term was coined during the 1980s, by the Swede Bo Adamson, when the Swedish and Danish State tightened up the rules which governed the energy consumption of new buildings. The development of modern appliances that are important for passive houses, such as FTX-systems with heat recovery or multiple glass windows with low u-value, was increased by heightened environmental awareness and rising energy prices. The term refers to a building whose energy consumption is relatively low and where heating demands are largely supplied by waste heat from appliances and heat from humans. The developments of passive houses have largely been with lessons learned from... (More)
The term "Passive house" refers to a voluntary standard that many new buildings meet. The term was coined during the 1980s, by the Swede Bo Adamson, when the Swedish and Danish State tightened up the rules which governed the energy consumption of new buildings. The development of modern appliances that are important for passive houses, such as FTX-systems with heat recovery or multiple glass windows with low u-value, was increased by heightened environmental awareness and rising energy prices. The term refers to a building whose energy consumption is relatively low and where heating demands are largely supplied by waste heat from appliances and heat from humans. The developments of passive houses have largely been with lessons learned from the world's first passive house that was built in Darmstadt, Germany. This residential building used in its time entirely new technologies for energy efficient design and, in many cases, new technology was developed specifically for this passive house. Technology has since then been refined and is now used in most modern passive houses. The proliferation of passive houses started off in the form of a successful project in the European Union auspices that went under the name CEPHEUS. The project sponsored 221 housing units in different climates and countries to prove that the concept was applicable in at least the whole of Europe and areas with similar climates. In modern Swedish buildings to be classified as passive houses, there are special requirements and advice that has been set up by the organization Forum for Energy Efficient Building (abbreviated FEBY in Swedish). In FEBYs requirements specification, a difference is made between the words "projected passive house according to FEBY" and "Verified passive house according to FEBY" when it comes to marketing of passive houses. These terms depend on the phase of which the building process the building is in. Although passive houses are considered to be a good economic investment, there are still some obstacles that are holding back development. A conservative construction industry contributes to a slower development. In some cases lack of competence regarding airtight- and moisture safe construction, which are particularly sensitive factors when building passive houses, is also holding back development. The thermal comfort is another problem that exists in some Swedish passive houses. The result of this work is a modern passive house which, if the recommendations are followed, meets all the requirements and advice that has been set up by FEBY for passive houses. The building is also designed so that energy efficient building design goes hand in hand with today's requirements of aesthetics, lighting and comfort. (Less)
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author
Martell, Olof and Pålsson, Oscar
organization
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
passivhus, energieffektivt byggande, feby, vip energy, passive house, energy efficient design
language
Swedish
id
1614577
date added to LUP
2010-06-11 00:00:00
date last changed
2018-10-18 10:11:12
@misc{1614577,
  abstract     = {The term "Passive house" refers to a voluntary standard that many new buildings meet. The term was coined during the 1980s, by the Swede Bo Adamson, when the Swedish and Danish State tightened up the rules which governed the energy consumption of new buildings. The development of modern appliances that are important for passive houses, such as FTX-systems with heat recovery or multiple glass windows with low u-value, was increased by heightened environmental awareness and rising energy prices. The term refers to a building whose energy consumption is relatively low and where heating demands are largely supplied by waste heat from appliances and heat from humans. The developments of passive houses have largely been with lessons learned from the world's first passive house that was built in Darmstadt, Germany. This residential building used in its time entirely new technologies for energy efficient design and, in many cases, new technology was developed specifically for this passive house. Technology has since then been refined and is now used in most modern passive houses. The proliferation of passive houses started off in the form of a successful project in the European Union auspices that went under the name CEPHEUS. The project sponsored 221 housing units in different climates and countries to prove that the concept was applicable in at least the whole of Europe and areas with similar climates. In modern Swedish buildings to be classified as passive houses, there are special requirements and advice that has been set up by the organization Forum for Energy Efficient Building (abbreviated FEBY in Swedish). In FEBYs requirements specification, a difference is made between the words "projected passive house according to FEBY" and "Verified passive house according to FEBY" when it comes to marketing of passive houses. These terms depend on the phase of which the building process the building is in. Although passive houses are considered to be a good economic investment, there are still some obstacles that are holding back development. A conservative construction industry contributes to a slower development. In some cases lack of competence regarding airtight- and moisture safe construction, which are particularly sensitive factors when building passive houses, is also holding back development. The thermal comfort is another problem that exists in some Swedish passive houses. The result of this work is a modern passive house which, if the recommendations are followed, meets all the requirements and advice that has been set up by FEBY for passive houses. The building is also designed so that energy efficient building design goes hand in hand with today's requirements of aesthetics, lighting and comfort.},
  author       = {Martell, Olof and Pålsson, Oscar},
  keyword      = {passivhus,energieffektivt byggande,feby,vip energy,passive house,energy efficient design},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Den Hållbara Villan - Design och Energistudie av ett Passivhus},
  year         = {2010},
}