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The Role of Formalized Education in Agricultural Production: An Analysis of Heartland Region Corn Yield, Farm Earnings, and Off-farm Labor Mobility, 1970-2000

Mineo, Justin LU (2010) EKHR23 20101
Department of Economic History
Abstract
Education’s role in agricultural production is commonly underestimated when compared to other sectors of the economy, yet the economical implications of formalized schooling on the farm have long been studied. In this thesis it is suggested that educational attainment has, indeed, long been a contributing factor in farming output, earnings, and labor mobility. More specifically, knowledge and skill have been instrumental dynamics of the differentiation amongst output, income, and transferability. The supply of educated farm youth and the demand for their labor have shifted throughout the twentieth century as they have been
shaped by institutional support and technological advancement. The last thirty years of the century in America’s most... (More)
Education’s role in agricultural production is commonly underestimated when compared to other sectors of the economy, yet the economical implications of formalized schooling on the farm have long been studied. In this thesis it is suggested that educational attainment has, indeed, long been a contributing factor in farming output, earnings, and labor mobility. More specifically, knowledge and skill have been instrumental dynamics of the differentiation amongst output, income, and transferability. The supply of educated farm youth and the demand for their labor have shifted throughout the twentieth century as they have been
shaped by institutional support and technological advancement. The last thirty years of the century in America’s most prolific farming region, the Heartland, reveals a landscape where formalized education, while universally offered, maintains specific value on and off the farm. However, a notable contradiction may exist between the respective roles of secondary and tertiary schooling, and all relationships involving any level of educational attainment are prone to changes over time. (Less)
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author
Mineo, Justin LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHR23 20101
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Education Agricultural Production Farm Labor Human Capital Mobility
language
English
id
1623888
date added to LUP
2010-07-01 13:54:18
date last changed
2010-07-01 13:54:18
@misc{1623888,
  abstract     = {Education’s role in agricultural production is commonly underestimated when compared to other sectors of the economy, yet the economical implications of formalized schooling on the farm have long been studied. In this thesis it is suggested that educational attainment has, indeed, long been a contributing factor in farming output, earnings, and labor mobility. More specifically, knowledge and skill have been instrumental dynamics of the differentiation amongst output, income, and transferability. The supply of educated farm youth and the demand for their labor have shifted throughout the twentieth century as they have been
shaped by institutional support and technological advancement. The last thirty years of the century in America’s most prolific farming region, the Heartland, reveals a landscape where formalized education, while universally offered, maintains specific value on and off the farm. However, a notable contradiction may exist between the respective roles of secondary and tertiary schooling, and all relationships involving any level of educational attainment are prone to changes over time.},
  author       = {Mineo, Justin},
  keyword      = {Education
Agricultural Production
Farm Labor
Human Capital
Mobility},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Role of Formalized Education in Agricultural Production: An Analysis of Heartland Region Corn Yield, Farm Earnings, and Off-farm Labor Mobility, 1970-2000},
  year         = {2010},
}