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Deconfessionalisation or reconfessionalisation? Religion as a coherent identity-signifier in a changing Lebanon.

Ingemansson, Emma LU (2010) STVM01 20101
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Political deconfessionalisation is a national objective for Lebanon, stated in the Taef
agreement that ended the civil war. The consociational democracy upon which Lebanon is
based, suggests a political representation of all groups in a pluralistic society. In Lebanon
these groups are the religious communities and the system is referred to as confessional. The
confessional system was viewed as an interim solution as its persistnace was argued as
harmful, however it is still very much prevailing today.
The process of deconfessionalisation is also known as national reconciliation and implies an
institutional reform. This reform seems far away and the project of deconfessionalition seems
postponed indefinitely. Instead, analysts... (More)
Political deconfessionalisation is a national objective for Lebanon, stated in the Taef
agreement that ended the civil war. The consociational democracy upon which Lebanon is
based, suggests a political representation of all groups in a pluralistic society. In Lebanon
these groups are the religious communities and the system is referred to as confessional. The
confessional system was viewed as an interim solution as its persistnace was argued as
harmful, however it is still very much prevailing today.
The process of deconfessionalisation is also known as national reconciliation and implies an
institutional reform. This reform seems far away and the project of deconfessionalition seems
postponed indefinitely. Instead, analysts suggest that Lebanon is rather witnessing a
reconfessionalisation with the political groups manifesting themselves even more along
sectarian lines.
Looking at the formation of collective identities and its reproduction I will argue that religion
remains a coherent identity signifier even when the Lebanese context is changing. If no
alternatives to a religious identity are created, how will deconfessionalisaiton be possible? (Less)
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author
Ingemansson, Emma LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVM01 20101
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Deconfessionalisation, Consociational democracy, Sectarianism, Identity, Religion, Security
language
English
id
1653130
date added to LUP
2010-09-13 09:35:16
date last changed
2010-09-13 09:35:16
@misc{1653130,
  abstract     = {Political deconfessionalisation is a national objective for Lebanon, stated in the Taef
agreement that ended the civil war. The consociational democracy upon which Lebanon is
based, suggests a political representation of all groups in a pluralistic society. In Lebanon
these groups are the religious communities and the system is referred to as confessional. The
confessional system was viewed as an interim solution as its persistnace was argued as
harmful, however it is still very much prevailing today.
The process of deconfessionalisation is also known as national reconciliation and implies an
institutional reform. This reform seems far away and the project of deconfessionalition seems
postponed indefinitely. Instead, analysts suggest that Lebanon is rather witnessing a
reconfessionalisation with the political groups manifesting themselves even more along
sectarian lines.
Looking at the formation of collective identities and its reproduction I will argue that religion
remains a coherent identity signifier even when the Lebanese context is changing. If no
alternatives to a religious identity are created, how will deconfessionalisaiton be possible?},
  author       = {Ingemansson, Emma},
  keyword      = {Deconfessionalisation,Consociational democracy,Sectarianism,Identity,Religion,Security},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Deconfessionalisation or reconfessionalisation? Religion as a coherent identity-signifier in a changing Lebanon.},
  year         = {2010},
}