Advanced

Reciprocity, Nepotism or Costly Signaling – Evidence from Mobile Phone Money Transfers in Nairobi

Eriksson, Martin LU (2010) NEKM01 20102
Department of Economics
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is to test whether the theories of reciprocal altruism, nepotism due to kin selection and costly signaling can explain patterns of human altruism. A new way of investigating this has surfaced since the introduction of mobile phone money transfers in areas where social sharing is frequently exercised. Data was collected from 167 respondents in Nairobi, Kenya on their latest mobile phone money transfer, the recipient and themselves.
Multivariate regression analysis concluded no significant effect of variables to support the strategies mentioned. Significant effects were however found in the variables of age and gender of the recipient, affecting generosity negatively. Control variables for relatedness however... (More)
The purpose of this thesis is to test whether the theories of reciprocal altruism, nepotism due to kin selection and costly signaling can explain patterns of human altruism. A new way of investigating this has surfaced since the introduction of mobile phone money transfers in areas where social sharing is frequently exercised. Data was collected from 167 respondents in Nairobi, Kenya on their latest mobile phone money transfer, the recipient and themselves.
Multivariate regression analysis concluded no significant effect of variables to support the strategies mentioned. Significant effects were however found in the variables of age and gender of the recipient, affecting generosity negatively. Control variables for relatedness however revealed that nepotism probably is exercised. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Eriksson, Martin LU
supervisor
organization
course
NEKM01 20102
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
costly signaling, nepotism, reciprocal altruism, mobile phone money transfers
language
English
id
1736073
date added to LUP
2010-12-06 12:59:14
date last changed
2010-12-06 12:59:14
@misc{1736073,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this thesis is to test whether the theories of reciprocal altruism, nepotism due to kin selection and costly signaling can explain patterns of human altruism. A new way of investigating this has surfaced since the introduction of mobile phone money transfers in areas where social sharing is frequently exercised. Data was collected from 167 respondents in Nairobi, Kenya on their latest mobile phone money transfer, the recipient and themselves.
Multivariate regression analysis concluded no significant effect of variables to support the strategies mentioned. Significant effects were however found in the variables of age and gender of the recipient, affecting generosity negatively. Control variables for relatedness however revealed that nepotism probably is exercised.},
  author       = {Eriksson, Martin},
  keyword      = {costly signaling,nepotism,reciprocal altruism,mobile phone money transfers},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Reciprocity, Nepotism or Costly Signaling – Evidence from Mobile Phone Money Transfers in Nairobi},
  year         = {2010},
}