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A Flammability Evaluation of Materials that Pose a Hazard in Nuclear Power Plants

Mångs, Olof (2001) In LUTVDG/TVBB--5078--SE
Division of Fire Safety Engineering
Fire Protection Engineering 3,5 years
Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety
Abstract
A detailed flammability evaluation of different materials used in the nuclear power industry is presented as an example of how important are physical observation and detailed analysis in the interpretation of test data. The objective is to provide different criteria that could allow the use of standard test data in fire modeling. So far most fire test data has only been used as an element for ranking and selection of materials.

The tests used are the open and closed cup burner tests (ASTM-D-56-87, ASTM-D-1310-86), the lateral ignition and flame spread test (ASTM-E-1321) and the oxygen consumption calorimeter (ASTM-E-1354). The materials evaluated are Lexan and two liquids, Tributyl Phosphate (C12 H27 04 H) and Tetrapropylene hydrogen... (More)
A detailed flammability evaluation of different materials used in the nuclear power industry is presented as an example of how important are physical observation and detailed analysis in the interpretation of test data. The objective is to provide different criteria that could allow the use of standard test data in fire modeling. So far most fire test data has only been used as an element for ranking and selection of materials.

The tests used are the open and closed cup burner tests (ASTM-D-56-87, ASTM-D-1310-86), the lateral ignition and flame spread test (ASTM-E-1321) and the oxygen consumption calorimeter (ASTM-E-1354). The materials evaluated are Lexan and two liquids, Tributyl Phosphate (C12 H27 04 H) and Tetrapropylene hydrogen (C12 H26). Lexan is a solid plastic sheet,
generally considered as fire resistant. The solid plastic sheet is currently proposed as an alternate to Plexiglas (i.e. Poly-methyl-methacrylate) for use as windows in glove boxes for service and maintenance of radioactive components in nuclear power plants. The two liquids are used in a mixture as extraction agents for radioactive materials. The fraction of each liquid chosen has been selected to optimize the process of extraction of radioactive waste.

The tests indicated that the Lexan sheet will melt long before it can be ignited. When mounted in a vertical position, the plastic material starts to melt and move at much lower heat fluxes than necessary for ignition. As a result it is likely that, when exposed to a fire, the plastic will melt and create a pool under the original position of the sheet before it ignites. Due to the melting behaviour it is unlikely to get upward flame spread over the material, but consequently, downward flame spread is almost instantaneous due to dripping.

The two liquids had very different fire properties. However, a mixture of the two liquids had the same fire properties as the most flammable liquid, even when the mixture only contained 30% of this liquid. A fire involving the mixed liquid should therefore be modeled with the properties of the most flammable liquid. (Less)
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author
Mångs, Olof
supervisor
organization
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Heat Release Rate, Tributyle Phosphate, Tetrapropylen Butylen, Lexan, Thermoplastics, Flame Spread, Fire Properties, Ignition, Cone Calorimeter, LIFT, FIST
publication/series
LUTVDG/TVBB--5078--SE
report number
5078
ISSN
1402-3504
language
English
id
1767326
date added to LUP
2011-01-26 08:50:16
date last changed
2014-03-10 10:40:36
@misc{1767326,
  abstract     = {A detailed flammability evaluation of different materials used in the nuclear power industry is presented as an example of how important are physical observation and detailed analysis in the interpretation of test data. The objective is to provide different criteria that could allow the use of standard test data in fire modeling. So far most fire test data has only been used as an element for ranking and selection of materials.

The tests used are the open and closed cup burner tests (ASTM-D-56-87, ASTM-D-1310-86), the lateral ignition and flame spread test (ASTM-E-1321) and the oxygen consumption calorimeter (ASTM-E-1354). The materials evaluated are Lexan and two liquids, Tributyl Phosphate (C12 H27 04 H) and Tetrapropylene hydrogen (C12 H26). Lexan is a solid plastic sheet,
generally considered as fire resistant. The solid plastic sheet is currently proposed as an alternate to Plexiglas (i.e. Poly-methyl-methacrylate) for use as windows in glove boxes for service and maintenance of radioactive components in nuclear power plants. The two liquids are used in a mixture as extraction agents for radioactive materials. The fraction of each liquid chosen has been selected to optimize the process of extraction of radioactive waste. 

The tests indicated that the Lexan sheet will melt long before it can be ignited. When mounted in a vertical position, the plastic material starts to melt and move at much lower heat fluxes than necessary for ignition. As a result it is likely that, when exposed to a fire, the plastic will melt and create a pool under the original position of the sheet before it ignites. Due to the melting behaviour it is unlikely to get upward flame spread over the material, but consequently, downward flame spread is almost instantaneous due to dripping.

The two liquids had very different fire properties. However, a mixture of the two liquids had the same fire properties as the most flammable liquid, even when the mixture only contained 30% of this liquid. A fire involving the mixed liquid should therefore be modeled with the properties of the most flammable liquid.},
  author       = {Mångs, Olof},
  issn         = {1402-3504},
  keyword      = {Heat Release Rate,Tributyle Phosphate,Tetrapropylen Butylen,Lexan,Thermoplastics,Flame Spread,Fire Properties,Ignition,Cone Calorimeter,LIFT,FIST},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {LUTVDG/TVBB--5078--SE},
  title        = {A Flammability Evaluation of Materials that Pose a Hazard in Nuclear Power Plants},
  year         = {2001},
}