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Societal Costs Associated with Air Pollution Related Ill-health: A Review of Methods and Results

Pervin, Tanjima (2008)
Department of Economics
Abstract
The aim of the paper is to provide a systematic review of the estimation of cost-of-illness (COI) due to air and noise pollution related ill-health. The methodology used for the review includes a systematic search on electronic databases for peer-review published literature and manual searches for the identification of unpublished literature. Searches are based on the major electronic databases such as EconLit, PubMed and International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS) and the WB. While the included studies conducted in different countries, for simplicity, we separate the studies whether they are from OECD countries or otherwise, along with their publication status (published in peer-reviewed journal or not). Following the... (More)
The aim of the paper is to provide a systematic review of the estimation of cost-of-illness (COI) due to air and noise pollution related ill-health. The methodology used for the review includes a systematic search on electronic databases for peer-review published literature and manual searches for the identification of unpublished literature. Searches are based on the major electronic databases such as EconLit, PubMed and International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS) and the WB. While the included studies conducted in different countries, for simplicity, we separate the studies whether they are from OECD countries or otherwise, along with their publication status (published in peer-reviewed journal or not). Following the selection criteria, in total 12 studies where 5 studies from OECD countries (2 unpublished) and 7 from non-OECD countries (2 unpublished) are included in the review. No COI study is found on noise pollution related ill-health. A majority of the studies look health impact of air pollutant PM10. In the estimation of COI, most of the studies consider both direct health care cost and the cost of productivity losses either due to mortality or morbidity or both but not intangible cost. The results of the COI studies show considerable variation, in part due to variations in pollution exposure levels and estimation methods particularly, cost estimations largely depend on the countries demographic compositions, health care systems and obviously included cost components. Although difficult to compare total COI across countries, however, it seems that a huge societal cost (e.g. 3.4% of GDP in Singapore and 1% of GDP in Jakarta) is concerned in with air pollution related health hazards. To increase awareness towards illnesses and conditions related with air pollution and to stimulate the policy debate on efficient allocation of resources, future research efforts should be directed towards theoretically sound and comprehensive COI studies with use of rich data (e.g. longitudinal and experimental data). (Less)
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@misc{1848792,
  abstract     = {The aim of the paper is to provide a systematic review of the estimation of cost-of-illness (COI) due to air and noise pollution related ill-health. The methodology used for the review includes a systematic search on electronic databases for peer-review published literature and manual searches for the identification of unpublished literature. Searches are based on the major electronic databases such as EconLit, PubMed and International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS) and the WB. While the included studies conducted in different countries, for simplicity, we separate the studies whether they are from OECD countries or otherwise, along with their publication status (published in peer-reviewed journal or not). Following the selection criteria, in total 12 studies where 5 studies from OECD countries (2 unpublished) and 7 from non-OECD countries (2 unpublished) are included in the review. No COI study is found on noise pollution related ill-health. A majority of the studies look health impact of air pollutant PM10. In the estimation of COI, most of the studies consider both direct health care cost and the cost of productivity losses either due to mortality or morbidity or both but not intangible cost. The results of the COI studies show considerable variation, in part due to variations in pollution exposure levels and estimation methods particularly, cost estimations largely depend on the countries demographic compositions, health care systems and obviously included cost components. Although difficult to compare total COI across countries, however, it seems that a huge societal cost (e.g. 3.4% of GDP in Singapore and 1% of GDP in Jakarta) is concerned in with air pollution related health hazards. To increase awareness towards illnesses and conditions related with air pollution and to stimulate the policy debate on efficient allocation of resources, future research efforts should be directed towards theoretically sound and comprehensive COI studies with use of rich data (e.g. longitudinal and experimental data).},
  author       = {Pervin, Tanjima},
  keyword      = {air pollution; ill-health; societal costs; systematic review,Economics, econometrics, economic theory, economic systems, economic policy,Nationalekonomi, ekonometri, ekonomisk teori, ekonomiska system, ekonomisk politik},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Societal Costs Associated with Air Pollution Related Ill-health: A Review of Methods and Results},
  year         = {2008},
}