Advanced

Attachment organization and perception of constraining and enabling factors in long distance relationships: A first step towards constructing an instrument to measure experiences of living in a long distance relationship

Fartouzy, Sara LU and Gilliard, Sara LU (2010) PSPT01 20092
Department of Psychology
Abstract (Swedish)
Living in long distance relationships (LDRs) has become a common phenomenon worldwide. LDR couples continously move in and out of each other's co-presence, and research has shown that the transitions between togetherness and separateness give rise to factors experienced as both constraining and enabling.
The present study extends LDR-research done by Sahlstein (2004) by taking attachment organization into account. A correlational study was utilized, involving 26 participants (15 females, 11 males, mean age 29.5) currently living in LDRs. The ECR-R self report questionnaire was used to assess the participants' attachment organizations. Based upon Sahlstein's research, the Fartouzy Gilliard Long Distance Relationship Scale (FGLDRS) was... (More)
Living in long distance relationships (LDRs) has become a common phenomenon worldwide. LDR couples continously move in and out of each other's co-presence, and research has shown that the transitions between togetherness and separateness give rise to factors experienced as both constraining and enabling.
The present study extends LDR-research done by Sahlstein (2004) by taking attachment organization into account. A correlational study was utilized, involving 26 participants (15 females, 11 males, mean age 29.5) currently living in LDRs. The ECR-R self report questionnaire was used to assess the participants' attachment organizations. Based upon Sahlstein's research, the Fartouzy Gilliard Long Distance Relationship Scale (FGLDRS) was constructed and carried out, as well as a short idealization inventory.
The research findings of this study support previous findings that anxious individuals are more vulnerable to geographical separations, and have a tendency to engage in positive illusions about their partners and relationships. The avoidant individuals seem to consider the discrepancy between togetherness and separateness less emotionally loaded. However, their lack of engagement in their relationships seem to be an expression of their working models about others, rather than as an expression of a lack of desire for a relationship. Taking attachment organization into account seems to be important in order to understand the experiences and reactions to living in a LDR. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Fartouzy, Sara LU and Gilliard, Sara LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSPT01 20092
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
attachment, avoidance, anxiety, long distance relationship, idealization, correlation
language
English
id
1969917
date added to LUP
2011-05-31 14:04:14
date last changed
2011-05-31 14:04:14
@misc{1969917,
  abstract     = {Living in long distance relationships (LDRs) has become a common phenomenon worldwide. LDR couples continously move in and out of each other's co-presence, and research has shown that the transitions between togetherness and separateness give rise to factors experienced as both constraining and enabling.
The present study extends LDR-research done by Sahlstein (2004) by taking attachment organization into account. A correlational study was utilized, involving 26 participants (15 females, 11 males, mean age 29.5) currently living in LDRs. The ECR-R self report questionnaire was used to assess the participants' attachment organizations. Based upon Sahlstein's research, the Fartouzy Gilliard Long Distance Relationship Scale (FGLDRS) was constructed and carried out, as well as a short idealization inventory.
The research findings of this study support previous findings that anxious individuals are more vulnerable to geographical separations, and have a tendency to engage in positive illusions about their partners and relationships. The avoidant individuals seem to consider the discrepancy between togetherness and separateness less emotionally loaded. However, their lack of engagement in their relationships seem to be an expression of their working models about others, rather than as an expression of a lack of desire for a relationship. Taking attachment organization into account seems to be important in order to understand the experiences and reactions to living in a LDR.},
  author       = {Fartouzy, Sara and Gilliard, Sara},
  keyword      = {attachment,avoidance,anxiety,long distance relationship,idealization,correlation},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Attachment organization and perception of constraining and enabling factors in long distance relationships: A first step towards constructing an instrument to measure experiences of living in a long distance relationship},
  year         = {2010},
}